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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Outbursts of sadism may occur episodically in fairly normal persons. Thus, 

Coutagne describes the case of a lad of 17--always regarded as quite 

normal, and without any signs of degeneracy, even on careful examination, 

or any traces of hysteria or alcoholism, though there was insanity among 

his cousins--who had had occasional sexual relations for a year or two, 

and on one occasion, being in a state of erection, struck the girl three 

times on the breast and abdomen with a kitchen knife bought for the 

purpose. He was much ashamed of his act immediately afterward, and, all 

the circumstances being taken into consideration, he was acquitted by the 

court.[104] Here we seem to have the obscure and latent fascination of 

blood, which is almost normal, germinating momentarily into an active 

impulse which is distinctly abnormal, though it produced little beyond 

those incisions which Vatsyayana disapproved of, but still regarded as a 

part of courtship. One step more and we are amid the most outrageous and 

extreme of all forms of sexual perversion: with the heroes of De Sade's 

novels, who, in exemplification of their author's most cherished ideals, 

plan scenes of debauchery in which the flowing of blood is an essential 

element of coitus; with the Marshall Gilles de Rais and the Hungarian 

Countess Bathory, whose lust could only be satiated by the death of 

innumerable victims. 

 

This impulse to stab--with no desire to kill, or even in most 

cases to give pain, but only to draw blood and so either 

stimulate or altogether gratify the sexual impulse--is no doubt 

the commonest form of sanguinary sadism. These women-stabbers 

have been known in France as _piqueurs_ for nearly a century, and 

in Germany are termed _Stecher_ or _Messerstecher_ (they have 

been studied by Naecke, "Zur Psychologie der sadistischen 

Messerstecher," _Archiv fuer Kriminal-Anthropologie_, Bd. 35, 

1909). A case of this kind where a man stabbed girls in the 

abdomen occurred in Paris in the middle of the eighteenth 

century, and in 1819 or 1820 there seems to have been an epidemic 

of _piqueurs_ in Paris; as we learn from a letter of Charlotte 

von Schiller's to Knebel; the offenders (though perhaps there was 

only one) frequented the Boulevards and the Palais Royal and 

stabbed women in the buttocks or thighs; they were never caught. 

About the same time similar cases of a slighter kind occurred in 

London, Brussels, Hamburg, and Munich. 

 

Stabbers are nearly always men, but cases of the same perversion 

in women are not unknown. Thus Dr. Kiernan informs me of an Irish 

woman, aged 40, and at the beginning of the menopause, who, in 

New York in 1909, stabbed five men with a hatpin. The motive was 

sexual and she told one of the men that she stabbed him because 

she "loved" him. 

 

 

 

Gilles de Rais, who had fought beside Joan of Arc, is the classic 

example of sadism in its extreme form, involving the murder of 

youths and maidens. Bernelle considers that there is some truth 

in the contention of Huysmans that the association with Joan of 

Arc was a predisposing cause in unbalancing Gilles de Rais. 

Another cause was his luxurious habit of life. He himself, no 

doubt rightly, attached importance to the suggestions received in 

reading Suetonius. He appears to have been a sexually precocious 

child, judging from an obscure passage in his confessions. He was 

artistic and scholarly, fond of books, of the society of learned 

men, and of music. Bernelle sums him up as "a pious warrior, a 

cruel and keen artist, a voluptuous assassin, an exalted mystic," 

who was at the same time unbalanced, a superior degenerate, and 

morbidly impulsive. (The best books on Gilles de Rais are the 

Abbe Bossard's _Gilles de Rais_, in which, however, the author, 

being a priest, treats his subject as quite sane and abnormally 


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