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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

effect that a young and beautiful woman desired to make the 

acquaintance of an energetic man. The wife, however, though she 

wished to please her husband, was not anxious to do so to this 

extent. She went to an hotel by appointment to meet a stranger 

who had answered this advertisement, but when she had explained 

to him the state of affairs he chivalrously conducted her home. 

It was some time before Sacher-Masoch eventually succeeded in 

rendering his wife unfaithful. He attended to the minutest 

details of her toilette on this occasion, and as he bade her 

farewell at the door he exclaimed: "How I envy him!" This episode 

thoroughly humiliated the wife, and from that moment her love for 

her husband turned to hate. A final separation was only a 

question of time. Sacher-Masoch formed a relationship with Hulda 

Meister, who had come to act as secretary and translator to him, 

while his wife became attached to Rosenthal, a clever journalist 

later known to readers of the _Figaro_ as "Jacques St.-Cere," who 

realized her painful position and felt sympathy and affection for 

her. She went to live with him in Paris and, having refused to 

divorce her husband, he eventually obtained a divorce from her; 

she states, however, that she never at any time had physical 

relationships with Rosenthal, who was a man of fragile 

organization and health. Sacher-Masoch united himself to Hulda 

Meister, who is described by the first wife as a prim and faded 

but coquettish old maid, and by the biographer as a highly 

accomplished and gentle woman, who cared for him with almost 

maternal devotion. No doubt there is truth in both descriptions. 

It must be noted that, as Wanda clearly shows, apart from his 

abnormal sexual temperament, Sacher-Masoch was kind and 

sympathetic, and he was strongly attached to his eldest child. 

Eulenburg also quotes the statement of a distinguished Austrian 

woman writer acquainted with him that, "apart from his sexual 

eccentricities, he was an amiable, simple, and sympathetic man 

with a touchingly tender love for his children." He had very few 

needs, did not drink or smoke, and though he liked to put the 

woman he was attached to in rich furs and fantastically gorgeous 

raiment he dressed himself with extreme simplicity. His wife 

quotes the saying of another woman that he was as simple as a 

child and as naughty as a monkey. 

 

In 1883 Sacher-Masoch and Hulda Meister settled in Lindheim, a 

village in Germany near the Taunus, a spot to which the novelist 

seems to have been attached because in the grounds of his little 

estate was a haunted and ruined tower associated with a tragic 

medieval episode. Here, after many legal delays, Sacher-Masoch 

was able to render his union with Hulda Meister legitimate; here 

two children were in due course born, and here the novelist spent 

the remaining years of his life in comparative peace. At first, 

as is usual, treated with suspicion by the peasants, 

Sacher-Masoch gradually acquired great influence over them; he 

became a kind of Tolstoy in the rural life around him, the friend 

and confidant of all the villagers (something of Tolstoy's 

communism is also, it appears, to be seen in the books he wrote 

at this time), while the theatrical performances which he 

inaugurated, and in which his wife took an active part, spread 

the fame of the household in many neighboring villages. Meanwhile 

his health began to break up; a visit to Nauheim in 1894 was of 

no benefit, and he died March 9, 1895. 

 

A careful consideration of the phenomena of sadism and masochism may be 

said to lead us to the conclusion that there is no real line of 

demarcation. Even De Sade himself was not a pure sadist, as Bloch's 

careful definition is alone sufficient to indicate; it might even be 


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