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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

A far more seriously disturbing influence had already begun to be 

exerted on his life by a series of love-episodes. Some of these 

were of slight and ephemeral character; some were a source of 

unalloyed happiness, all the more so if there was an element of 

extravagance to appeal to his Quixotic nature. He always longed 

to give a dramatic and romantic character to his life, his wife 

says, and he spent some blissful days on an occasion when he ran 

away to Florence with a Russian princess as her private 

secretary. Most often these episodes culminated in deception and 

misery. It was after a relationship of this kind from which he 

could not free himself for four years that he wrote _Die 

Geschiedene Frau, Passionsgeschichte eines Idealisten_, putting 

into it much of his own personal history. At one time he was 

engaged to a sweet and charming young girl. Then it was that he 

met a young woman at Graz, Laura Ruemelin, 27 years of age, 

engaged as a glove-maker, and living with her mother. Though of 

poor parentage, with little or no knowledge of the world, she had 

great natural ability and intelligence. Schlichtegroll represents 

her as spontaneously engaging in a mysterious intrigue with the 

novelist. Her own detailed narrative renders the circumstances 

more intelligible. She approached Sacher-Masoch by letter, 

adopting for disguise the name of his heroine Wanda von Dunajev, 

in order to recover possession of some compromising letters which 

had been written to him, as a joke, by a friend of hers. 

Sacher-Masoch insisted on seeing his correspondent before 

returning the letters, and with his eager thirst for romantic 

adventure he imagined that she was a married woman of the 

aristocratic world, probably a Russian countess, whose simple 

costume was a disguise. Not anxious to reveal the prosaic facts, 

she humored him in his imaginations and a web of mystification 

was thus formed. A strong attraction grew up on both sides and, 

though for some time Laura Ruemelin maintained the mystery and 

held herself aloof from him, a relationship was formed and a 

child born. Thereupon, in 1893, they married. Before long, 

however, there was disillusion on both sides. She began to detect 

the morbid, chimerical, and unpractical aspects of his character, 

and he realized that not only was his wife not an aristocrat, 

but, what was of more importance to him, she was by no means the 

domineering heroine of his dreams. Soon after marriage, in the 

course of an innocent romp in which the whole of the small 

household took part, he asked his wife to inflict a whipping on 

him. She refused, and he thereupon suggested that the servant 

should do it; the wife failed to take this idea seriously; but he 

had it carried out, with great satisfaction at the severity of 

the castigation he received. When, however, his wife explained to 

him that, after this incident, it was impossible for the servant 

to stay, Sacher-Masoch quite agreed and she was at once 

discharged. But he constantly found pleasure in placing his wife 

in awkward or compromising circumstances, a pleasure she was too 

normal to share. This necessarily led to much domestic 

wretchedness. He had persuaded her, against her wish, to whip him 

nearly every day, with whips which he devised, having nails 

attached to them. He found this a stimulant to his literary work, 

and it enabled him to dispense in his novels with his stereotyped 

heroine who is always engaged in subjugating men, for, as he 

explained to his wife, when he had the reality in his life he was 

no longer obsessed by it in his imaginative dreams. Not content 

with this, however, he was constantly desirous for his wife to be 

unfaithful. He even put an advertisement in a newspaper to the 


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