Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

to beg forgiveness. As the boy escaped he saw her kick her 

husband. The child could not resist the temptation to return to 

the spot; the door was closed and he could see nothing, but he 

heard the sound of the whip and the groans of the Count beneath 

his wife's blows. 

 

It is unnecessary to insist that in this scene, acting on a 

highly sensitive and somewhat peculiar child, we have the key to 

the emotional attitude which affected so much of Sacher-Masoch's 

work. As his biographer remarks, woman became to him, during a 

considerable part of his life, a creature at once to be loved and 

hated, a being whose beauty and brutality enabled her to set her 

foot at will on the necks of men, and in the heroine of his first 

important novel, the _Emissaer_, dealing with the Polish 

Revolution, he embodied the contradictory personality of Countess 

Xenobia. Even the whip and the fur garments, Sacher-Masoch's 

favorite emotional symbols, find their explanation in this early 

episode. He was accustomed to say of an attractive woman: "I 

should like to see her in furs," and, of an unattractive woman: 

"I could not imagine her in furs." His writing-paper at one time 

was adorned with the figure of a woman in Russian Boyar costume, 

her cloak lined with ermine, and brandishing a scourge. On his 

walls he liked to have pictures of women in furs, of the kind of 

which there is so magnificent an example by Rubens in the gallery 

at Munich. He would even keep a woman's fur cloak on an ottoman 

in his study and stroke it from time to time, finding that his 

brain thus received the same kind of stimulation as Schiller 

found in the odor of rotten apples.[97] 

 

At the age of 13, in the revolution of 1848, young Sacher-Masoch 

received his baptism of fire; carried away in the popular 

movement, he helped to defend the barricades together with a 

young lady, a relative of his family, an amazon with a pistol in 

her girdle, such as later he loved to depict. This episode was, 

however, but a brief interruption of his education; he pursued 

his studies with brilliance, and on the higher side his education 

was aided by his father's esthetic tastes. Amateur theatricals 

were in special favor at his home, and here even the serious 

plays of Goethe and Gogol were performed, thus helping to train 

and direct the boy's taste. It is, perhaps, however, significant 

that it was a tragic event which, at the age of 16, first brought 

to him the full realization of life and the consciousness of his 

own power. This was the sudden death of his favorite sister. He 

became serious and quiet, and always regarded this grief as a 

turning-point in his life. 

 

At the Universities of Prague and Graz he studied with such zeal 

that when only 19 he took his doctor's degree in law and shortly 

afterward became a _privatdocent_ for German history at Graz. 

Gradually, however, the charms of literature asserted themselves 

definitely, and he soon abandoned teaching. He took part, 

however, in the war of 1866 in Italy, and at the battle of 

Solferino he was decorated on the field for bravery in action by 

the Austrian field-marshal. These incidents, however, had little 

disturbing influence on Sacher-Masoch's literary career, and he 

was gradually acquiring a European reputation by his novels and 

stories. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Page 4 from 4:  Back   1   2   3  [4]