Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Sacher, a young Spanish nobleman, in the sixteenth century, who 

settled in Prague. The novelist's father was director of police 

in Lemberg and married Charlotte von Masoch, a Little Russian 

lady of noble birth. The novelist, the eldest child of this 

union, was not born until after nine years of marriage, and in 

infancy was so delicate that he was not expected to survive. He 

began to improve, however, when his mother gave him to be suckled 

to a robust Russian peasant woman, from whom, as he said later, 

he gained not only health, but "his soul"; from her he learned 

all the strange and melancholy legends of her people and a love 

of the Little Russians which never left him. While still a child 

young Sacher-Masoch was in the midst of the bloody scenes of the 

revolution which culminated in 1848. When he was 12 the family 

migrated to Prague, and the boy, though precocious in his 

development, then first learned the German language, of which he 

attained so fine a mastery. At a very early age he had found the 

atmosphere, and even some of the most characteristic elements, of 

the peculiar types which mark his work as a novelist. 

 

It is interesting to trace the germinal elements of those 

peculiarities which so strongly affected his imagination on the 

sexual side. As a child, he was greatly attracted by 

representations of cruelty; he loved to gaze at pictures of 

executions, the legends of martyrs were his favorite reading, and 

with the onset of puberty he regularly dreamed that he was 

fettered and in the power of a cruel woman who tortured him. It 

has been said by an anonymous author that the women of Galicia 

either rule their husbands entirely and make them their slaves or 

themselves sink to be the wretchedest of slaves. At the age of 

10, according to Schlichtegroll's narrative, the child Leopold 

witnessed a scene in which a woman of the former kind, a certain 

Countess Xenobia X., a relative of his own on the paternal side, 

played the chief part, and this scene left an undying impress on 

his imagination. The Countess was a beautiful but wanton 

creature, and the child adored her, impressed alike by her beauty 

and the costly furs she wore. She accepted his devotion and 

little services and would sometimes allow him to assist her in 

dressing; on one occasion, as he was kneeling before her to put 

on her ermine slippers, he kissed her feet; she smiled and gave 

him a kick which filled him with pleasure. Not long afterward 

occurred the episode which so profoundly affected his 

imagination. He was playing with his sisters at hide-and-seek and 

had carefully hidden himself behind the dresses on a clothes-rail 

in the Countess's bedroom. At this moment the Countess suddenly 

entered the house and ascended the stairs, followed by a lover, 

and the child, who dared not betray his presence, saw the 

countess sink down on a sofa and begin to caress her lover. But a 

few moments later the husband, accompanied by two friends, dashed 

into the room. Before, however, he could decide which of the 

lovers to turn against the Countess had risen and struck him so 

powerful a blow in the face with her fist that he fell back 

streaming with blood. She then seized a whip, drove all three men 

out of the room, and in the confusion the lover slipped away. At 

this moment the clothes-rail fell and the child, the involuntary 

witness of the scene, was revealed to the Countess, who now fell 

on him in anger, threw him to the ground, pressed her knee on his 

shoulder, and struck him unmercifully. The pain was great, and 

yet he was conscious of a strange pleasure. While this 

castigation was proceeding the Count returned, no longer in a 

rage, but meek and humble as a slave, and kneeled down before her 


Page 3 from 4:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   Forward