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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

novelist in a novel written many years ago represents her hero, a robust 

soldier, imploring the lady of his love, in a moment of passionate 

exaltation, to trample on him, certainly without any wish to suggest 

sexual perversion. If it is true that the Antonio of Otway's _Venice 

Preserved_ is a caricature of Shaftesbury, then it would appear that one 

of the greatest of English statesmen was supposed to exhibit very 

pronounced and characteristic masochistic tendencies; and in more recent 

days masochistic expressions have been noted as occurring in the 

love-letters of so emphatically virile a statesman as Bismarck. 

 

Thus a minor degree of the masochistic tendency may be said to be fairly 

common, while its more pronounced manifestations are more common than 

pronounced sadism.[94] It very frequently affects persons of a sensitive, 

refined, and artistic temperament. It may even be said that this tendency 

is in the line of civilization. Krafft-Ebing points out that some of the 

most delicate and romantic love-episodes of the Middle Ages are distinctly 

colored by masochistic emotion.[95] The increasing tendency to masochism 

with increasing civilization becomes explicable if we accept Colin Scott's 

"secondary law of courting" as accessory to the primary law that the male 

is active, and the female passive and imaginatively attentive to the 

states of the excited male. According to the secondary law, "the female 

develops a superadded activity, the male becoming relatively passive and 

imaginatively attentive to the psychical and bodily states of the 

female."[96] We may probably agree that this "secondary law of courting" 

does really represent a tendency of love in individuals of complex and 

sensitive nature, and the outcome of such a receptive attitude on the part 

of the male is undoubtedly in well-marked cases a desire of submission to 

the female's will, and a craving to experience in some physical or psychic 

form, not necessarily painful, the manifestations of her activity. 

 

When we turn from vague and unpronounced forms of the masochistic tendency 

to the more definite forms in which it becomes an unquestionable sexual 

perversion, we find a very eminent and fairly typical example in Rousseau, 

an example all the more interesting because here the subject has himself 

portrayed his perversion in his famous _Confessions_. It is, however, the 

name of a less eminent author, the Austrian novelist, Sacher-Masoch, which 

has become identified with the perversion through the fact that 

Krafft-Ebing fixed upon it as furnishing a convenient counterpart to the 

term "sadism." It is on the strength of a considerable number of his 

novels and stories, more especially of _Die Venus im Pelz_, that 

Krafft-Ebing took the scarcely warrantable liberty of identifying his 

name, while yet living, with a sexual perversion. 

 

Sacher-Masoch's biography has been written with intimate 

knowledge and much candor by C.F. von Schlichtegroll 

(_Sacher-Masoch und der Masochismus_, 1901) and, more indirectly, 

by his first wife Wanda von Sacher-Masoch in her autobiography 

(_Meine Lebensbeichte_, 1906; French translation, _Confession de 

ma Vie_, 1907). Schlichtegroll's book is written with a somewhat 

undue attempt to exalt his hero and to attribute his misfortunes 

to his first wife. The autobiography of the latter, however, 

enables us to form a more complete picture of Sacher-Masoch's 

life, for, while his wife by no means spares herself, she clearly 

shows that Sacher-Masoch was the victim of his own abnormal 

temperament, and she presents both the sensitive, refined, 

exalted, and generous aspects of his nature, and his morbid, 

imaginative, vain aspects. 

 

Leopold von Sacher-Masoch was born in 1836 at Lemberg in Galicia. 

He was of Spanish, German, and more especially Slavonic race. The 

founder of the family may be said to be a certain Don Matthias 


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