Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

I have noted some of the feminine traits in De Sade's temperament 

and appearance. The same may often be noted in sadists whose 

crimes were very much more serious and brutal than those of De 

Sade. A man who stabbed women in the streets at St. Louis was a 

waiter with a high-pitched, effeminate voice and boyish 

appearance. Reidel, the sadistic murderer, was timid, modest, and 

delicate; he was too shy to urinate in the presence of other 

people. A sadistic zooephilist, described by A. Marie, who 

attempted to strangle a woman fellow-worker, had always been very 

timid, blushed with much facility, could not look even children 

in the eyes, or urinate in the presence of another person, or 

make sexual advances to women. 

 

Kiernan and Moyer are inclined to connect the modesty and 

timidity of sadists with a disgust for normal coitus. They were 

called upon to examine an inverted married woman who had 

inflicted several hundred wounds, mostly superficial, with forks, 

scissors, etc., on the genital organs and other parts of a girl 

whom she had adopted from a "Home." This woman was very prominent 

in church and social matters in the city in which she lived, so 

that many clergymen and local persons of importance testified to 

her chaste, modest, and even prudish character; she was found to 

be sane at the time of the acts. (Moyer, _Alienist and 

Neurologist_, May, 1907, and private letter from Dr. Kiernan.) 

 

We are thus led to another sexual perversion, which is usually considered 

the opposite of sadism. Masochism is commonly regarded as a peculiarly 

feminine sexual perversion, in women, indeed, as normal in some degree, 

and in man as a sort of inversion of the normal masculine emotional 

attitude, but this view of the matter is not altogether justified, for 

definite and pronounced masochism seems to be much rarer in women than 

sadism.[88] Krafft-Ebing, whose treatment of this phenomenon is, perhaps, 

his most valuable and original contribution to sexual psychology, has 

dealt very fully with the matter and brought forward many cases. He thus 

defines this perversion: "By masochism I understand a peculiar perversion 

of the psychical _vita sexualis_ in which the individual affected, in 

sexual feeling and thought, is controlled by the idea of being completely 

and unconditionally subject to the will of a person of the opposite sex, 

of being treated by this person as by a master, humiliated and abused. 

This idea is colored by sexual feeling; the masochist lives in fancies in 

which he creates situations of this kind, and he often attempts to realize 

them."[89] 

 

In a minor degree, not amounting to a complete perversion of the sexual 

instinct, this sentiment of abnegation, the desire to be even physically 

subjected to the adored woman, cannot be regarded as abnormal. More than 

two centuries before Krafft-Ebing appeared, Robert Burton, who was no mean 

psychologist, dilated on the fact that love is a kind of slavery. "They 

are commonly slaves," he wrote of lovers, "captives, voluntary servants; 

_amator amicae mancipium_, as Castilio terms him; his mistress's servant, 

her drudge, prisoner, bondman, what not?"[90] Before Burton's time the 

legend of the erotic servitude of Aristotle was widely spread in Europe, 

and pictures exist of the venerable philosopher on all fours ridden by a 

woman with a whip.[91] In classic times various masochistic phenomena are 

noted with approval by Ovid. It has been pointed out by Moll[92] that 

there are traces of masochistic feeling in some of Goethe's poems, 

especially "Lilis Park" and "Erwin und Elmire." Similar traces have been 

found in the poems of Heine, Platen, Hamerling, and many other poets.[93] 

The poetry of the people is also said to contain many such traces. It may, 

indeed, be said that passion in its more lyric exaltations almost 

necessarily involves some resort to masochistic expression. A popular lady 


Page 1 from 4: [1]  2   3   4   Forward