Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

not stop coitus by no means proves that it did not begin it, for, when the 

central nervous mechanism is once set in action, it can continue even when 

the exciting stimulus is removed. By extirpating the testicles some months 

before the sexual season he found that no coitus occurred. At the same 

time, even in these frogs, a certain degree of sexual inclination and a 

certain excitability of the embracing center still persisted, disappearing 

when the sexual epoch was over. 

 

According to most recent writers, the seminal vesicles of mammals are 

receptacles for their own albuminous secretion, the function of which is 

unknown. Steinach could find no spermatozoa in these "seminal" sacs, and 

therefore he proposed to use Owen's name of _glandulae vesiculares_. After 

extirpation of these vesicular glands in the white rat typical coitus 

occurred. But the capacity for _procreation_ was diminished, and 

extirpation of both _glandulae vesiculares_ and _glandulae prostaticae_ led 

to disappearance of the capacity for procreation. Steinach came to the 

conclusion that this is because the secretions of these glands impart 

increased vitality to the spermatozoa, and he points out that great 

fertility and high development of the accessory sexual glands go together. 

Steinach found that, when sexually mature white rats were castrated, 

though at first they remained as potent as ever, their potency gradually 

declined; sexual excitement, however, and sexual inclination always 

persisted. He then proceeded to castrate rats before puberty and 

discovered the highly significant fact that in these also a quite 

considerable degree of sexual inclination appeared. They followed, 

sniffed, and licked the females like ordinary males; and that this was not 

a mere indication of curiosity was shown by the fact that they made 

attempts at coitus which only differed from those of normal males by the 

failure of erection and ejaculation, though, occasionally, there was 

imperfect erection. This lasted for a year, and then their sexual 

inclinations began to decline, and they showed signs of premature age. 

These manifestations of sexual sense Steinach compares to those noted in 

the human species during childhood.[6] 

 

The genesic tendencies are thus, to a certain degree, independent of the 

generative glands, although the development of these glands serves to 

increase the genesic ability and to furnish the impulsion necessary to 

assure procreation, as well as to insure the development of the secondary 

sexual characters, probably by the influence of secretions elaborated and 

thrown into the system from the primary sexual glands.[7] 

 

Halban ("Die Entstehung der Geschlechtscharaktere," _Archiv fuer 

Gynaekologie_, 1903, pp. 205-308) argues that the primary sex 

glands do not necessarily produce the secondary sex characters, 

nor inhibit the development of those characteristic of the 

opposite sex. It is indeed the rule, but it is not the inevitable 

result. Sexual differences exist from the first. Nussbaum made 

experiments on frogs (_Rana fusca_), which go through a yearly 

cycle of secondary sexual changes at the period of heat. These 

changes cease on castration, but, if the testes of other frogs 

are introduced beneath the skin of the castrated frogs, Nussbaum 

found that they acted as if the frog had not been castrated. It 

is the secretion of the testes which produces the secondary 

sexual changes. But Nussbaum found that the testicular secretion 

does not work if the nerves of the secondary sexual region are 

cut, and that the secretion has no direct action on the organism. 

Pflueger, discussing these experiments (_Archiv fuer die Gesammte 

Physiologie_, 1907, vol. cxvi, parts 5 and 6), disputes this 

conclusion, and argues that the secretion is not dependent on the 

action of the nervous system, and that therefore the secondary 


Page 4 from 5:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   Forward