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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

serious scientific sense to it. Loeb's influence has especially 

given force to this tendency. Thus, while Pieron, in an 

interesting discussion of the question ("Les Problemes Actuels de 

l'Instinct," _Revue Philosophique_, Oct., 1908), thinks it would 

still be convenient to retain the term, giving it a philosophical 

meaning, Georges Bohn, who devotes a chapter to the notion of 

instinct (_La Naissance de l'Intelligence_, 1909), is strongly in 

favor of eliminating the word, as being merely a legacy of 

medieval theologians and metaphysicians, serving to conceal our 

ignorance or our lack of exact analysis. 

 

It may be said that the whole of the task undertaken in these _Studies_ is 

really an attempt to analyze what is commonly called the sexual instinct. 

In order to grasp it we have to break it up into its component parts. 

Lloyd Morgan has pointed out that the components of an instinct may be 

regarded as four: first, the internal messages giving rise to the impulse; 

secondly, the external stimuli which co-operate with the impulse to affect 

the nervous centers; thirdly, the active response due to the co-ordinate 

outgoing discharges; and, fourthly, the message from the organs concerned 

in the behavior by which the central nervous system is further 

affected.[1] 

 

In dealing with the sexual instinct the first two factors are those which 

we have most fully to discuss. With the external stimuli we shall be 

concerned in a future volume (IV). We may here confine ourselves mainly to 

the first factor: the nature of the internal messages which prompt the 

sexual act. We may, in other words, attempt to analyze the _sexual 

impulse_. 

 

The first definition of the sexual impulse we meet with is that which 

regards it as an impulse of evacuation. The psychological element is thus 

reduced to a minimum. It is true that, especially in early life, the 

emotions caused by forced repression of the excretions are frequently 

massive or acute in the highest degree, and the joy of relief 

correspondingly great. But in adult life, on most occasions, these desires 

can be largely pushed into the background of consciousness, partly by 

training, partly by the fact that involuntary muscular activity is less 

imperative in adult life; so that the ideal element in connection with the 

ordinary excretions is almost a negligible quantity. The evacuation theory 

of the sexual instinct is, however, that which has most popular vogue, and 

the cynic delights to express it in crude language. It is the view that 

appeals to the criminal mind, and in the slang of French criminals the 

brothel is _le cloaque_. It was also the view implicitly accepted by 

medieval ascetic writers, who regarded woman as "a temple built over a 

sewer," and from a very different standpoint it was concisely set forth by 

Montaigne, who has doubtless contributed greatly to support this view of 

the matter: "I find," he said, "that Venus, after all, is nothing more 

than the pleasure of discharging our vessels, just as nature renders 

pleasurable the discharges from other parts."[2] Luther, again, always 

compared the sexual to the excretory impulse, and said that marriage was 

just as necessary as the emission of urine. Sir Thomas More, also, in the 

second book of _Utopia_, referring to the pleasure of evacuation, speaks 

of that felt "when we do our natural easement, or when we be doing the act 

of generation." This view would, however, scarcely deserve serious 

consideration if various distinguished investigators, among whom Fere may 

be specially mentioned, had not accepted it as the best and most accurate 

definition of the sexual impulse. "The genesic need may be considered," 

writes Fere, "as a need of evacuation; the choice is determined by the 

excitations which render the evacuation more agreeable."[3] Certain facts 

observed in the lower animals tend to support this view; it is, therefore, 

necessary, in the first place, to set forth the main results of 


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