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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE. 

 

Definition of Instinct--The Sexual Impulse a Factor of the Sexual 

Instinct--Theory of the Sexual Impulse as an Impulse of Evacuation--The 

Evidence in Support of this Theory Inadequate--The Sexual Impulse to Some 

Extent Independent of the Sexual Glands--The Sexual Impulse in Castrated 

Animals and Men--The Sexual Impulse in Castrated Women, after the 

Menopause, and in the Congenital Absence of the Sexual Glands--The 

Internal Secretions--Analogy between the Sexual Relationship and that of 

the Suckling Mother and her Child--The Theory of the Sexual Impulse as a 

Reproductive Impulse--This Theory Untenable--Moll's Definition--The 

Impulse of Detumescence--The Impulse of Contrectation--Modification of 

this Theory Proposed--Its Relation to Darwin's Sexual Selection--The 

Essential Element in Darwin's Conception--Summary of the History of the 

Doctrine of Sexual Selection--Its Psychological Aspect--Sexual Selection a 

Part of Natural Selection--The Fundamental Importance of 

Tumescence--Illustrated by the Phenomena of Courtship in Animals and in 

Man--The Object of Courtship is to Produce Sexual Tumescence--The 

Primitive Significance of Dancing in Animals and Man--Dancing is a Potent 

Agent for Producing Tumescence--The Element of Truth in the Comparison of 

the Sexual Impulse with an Evacuation, Especially of the Bladder--Both 

Essentially Involve Nervous Explosions--Their Intimate and Sometimes 

Vicarious Relationships--Analogy between Coitus and Epilepsy--Analogy of 

the Sexual Impulse to Hunger--Final Object of the Impulses of Tumescence 

and Detumescence. 

 

 

The term "sexual instinct" may be said to cover the whole of the 

neuropsychic phenomena of reproduction which man shares with the lower 

animals. It is true that much discussion has taken place concerning the 

proper use of the term "instinct," and some definitions of instinctive 

action would appear to exclude the essential mechanism of the process 

whereby sexual reproduction is assured. Such definitions scarcely seem 

legitimate, and are certainly unfortunate. Herbert Spencer's definition of 

instinct as "compound reflex action" is sufficiently clear and definite 

for ordinary use. 

 

A fairly satisfactory definition of instinct is that supplied by 

Dr. and Mrs. Peckham in the course of their study _On the 

Instincts and Habits of Solitary Wasps_. "Under the term 

'instinct,'" they say, "we place all complex acts which are 

performed previous to experience and in a similar manner by all 

members of the same sex and race, leaving out as non-essential, 

at this time, the question of whether they are or are not 

accompanied by consciousness." This definition is quoted with 

approval by Lloyd Morgan, who modifies and further elaborates it 

(_Animal Behavior_, 1900, p. 21). "The distinction between 

instinctive and reflex behavior," he remarks, "turns in large 

degree on their relative complexity," and instinctive behavior, 

he concludes, may be said to comprise "those complex groups of 

co-ordinated acts which are, on their first occurrence, 

independent of experience; which tend to the well-being of the 

individual and the preservation of the race; which are due to the 

co-operation of external and internal stimuli; which are 

similarly performed by all the members of the same more or less 

restricted group of animals; but which are subject to variation, 

and to subsequent modification under the guidance of experience." 

Such a definition clearly justifies us in speaking of a "sexual 

instinct." It may be added that the various questions involved in 

the definition of the sexual instinct have been fully discussed 

by Moll in the early sections of his _Untersuchungen ueber die 

Libido Sexualis_. 

 

Of recent years there has been a tendency to avoid the use of the 

term "instinct," or, at all events, to refrain from attaching any 


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