Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

degenerate. In the asylum he amused himself by organizing a 

theater. Lacroix, many years later, questioning old people who 

had known him, was surprised to find that even in the memory of 

most virtuous and respectable persons he lived merely as an 

"_aimable mauvais sujet_." It is noteworthy that De Sade aroused, 

in a singular degree, the love and devotion of women,--whether or 

not we may regard this as evidence of the fascination exerted on 

women by cruelty. Janin remarks that he had seen many pretty 

little letters written by young and charming women of the great 

world, begging for the release of the "_pauvre marquis_." 

 

Sardou, the dramatist, has stated that in 1855 he visited the 

Bicetre and met an old gardener who had known De Sade during his 

reclusion there. He told that one of the marquis's amusements 

was to procure baskets of the most beautiful and expensive roses; 

he would then sit on a footstool by a dirty streamlet which ran 

through the courtyard, and would take the roses, one by one, gaze 

at them, smell them with a voluptuous expression, soak them in 

the muddy water, and fling them away, laughing as he did so. He 

died on the 2d of December, 1814, at the age of 74. He was almost 

blind, and had long been a martyr to gout, asthma, and an 

affection of the stomach. It was his wish that acorns should be 

planted over his grave and his memory effaced. At a later period 

his skull was examined by a phrenologist, who found it small and 

well formed; "one would take it at first for a woman's head." The 

skull belonged to Dr. Londe, but about the middle of the century 

it was stolen by a doctor who conveyed it to England, where it 

may possibly yet be found. [The foregoing account is mainly 

founded on Paul Lacroix, _Revue de Paris_, 1837, and _Curiosites 

de l'Histoire de France_, second series, _Proces Celebres_, p. 

225; Janin, _Revue de Paris_, 1834; Eugen Duehren (Iwan Bloch), 

_Der Marquis de Sade und Seine Zeit_, third edition, 1901; id., 

_Neue Forschungen ueber den Marquis de Sade und Seine Zeit_, 1904; 

Lacassagne, _Vacher l'Eventreur et les Crimes Sadiques_, 1899; 

Paul Ginisty, _La Marquise de Sade_, 1901.] 

 

The attempt to define sadism strictly and penetrate to its roots in De 

Sade's personal temperament reveals a certain weakness in the current 

conception of this sexual perversion. It is not, as we might infer, both 

from the definition usually given and from its probable biological 

heredity from primitive times, a perversion due to excessive masculinity. 

The strong man is more apt to be tender than cruel, or at all events knows 

how to restrain within bounds any impulse to cruelty; the most extreme and 

elaborate forms of sadism (putting aside such as are associated with a 

considerable degree of imbecility) are more apt to be allied with a 

somewhat feminine organization. Montaigne, indeed, observed long ago that 

cruelty is usually accompanied by feminine softness. 

 

In the same way it is a mistake to suppose that the very feminine 

woman is not capable of sadistic tendencies. Even if we take into 

account the primitive animal conditions of combat, the male must 

suffer as well as inflict pain, and the female must not only 

experience subjection to the male, but also share in the emotions 

of her partner's victory over his rivals. As bearing on these 

points, I may quote the following remarks written by a lady: "It 

is said that, the weaker and more feminine a woman is, the 

greater the subjection she likes. I don't think it has anything 

at all to do with the general character, but depends entirely on 

whether the feeling of constraint and helplessness affects her 

sexually. In men I have several times noticed that those who were 

most desirous of subjection to the women they loved had, in 


Page 4 from 5:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   Forward