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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

extreme offenses were the indecent and forcible flagellation in 

1768 of a young woman, Rosa Keller, who had accosted him in the 

street for alms, and whom he induced by false pretenses to come 

to his house, and the administration of aphrodisiacal bonbons to 

some prostitutes at Marseilles. It is owing to the fact that the 

prime of his manhood was spent in prisons that De Sade fell back 

on dreaming, study, and novel-writing. Shut out from real life, 

he solaced his imagination with the perverted visions--to a very 

large extent, however, founded on knowledge of the real facts of 

perverted life in his time--which he has recorded in _Justine_ 

(1781); _Les 120 Journees de Sodome ou l'Ecole du Libertinage_ 

(1785); _Aline et Valcour ou le Roman Philosophique_ (1788); 

_Juliette_ (1796); _La Philosophie dans le Boudoir_ (1795). These 

books constitute a sort of encyclopedia of sexual perversions, an 

eighteenth century _Psychopathia Sexualis_, and embody, at the 

same time, a philosophy. He was the first, Bloch remarks, who 

realized the immense importance of the sexual question. His 

general attitude may be illustrated by the following passage (as 

quoted by Lacassagne): "If there are beings in the world whose 

acts shock all accepted prejudices, we must not preach at them or 

punish them ... because their bizarre tastes no more depend upon 

themselves than it depends on you whether you are witty or 

stupid, well made or hump-backed.... What would become of your 

laws, your morality, your religion, your gallows, your Paradise, 

your gods, your hell, if it were shown that such and such 

fluids, such fibers, or a certain acridity in the blood, or in 

the animal spirits, alone suffice to make a man the object of 

your punishments or your rewards?" He was enormously well read, 

Bloch points out, and his interest extended to every field of 

literature: _belles lettres_, philosophy, theology, politics, 

sociology, ethnology, mythology, and history. Perhaps his 

favorite reading was travels. He was minutely familiar with the 

bible, though his attitude was extremely critical. His favorite 

philosopher was Lamettrie, whom he very frequently quotes, and he 

had carefully studied Machiavelli. 

 

De Sade had foreseen the Revolution; he was an ardent admirer of 

Marat, and at this period he entered into public life as a mild, 

gentle, rather bald and gray-haired person. Many scenes of the 

Revolution were the embodiment in real life of De Sade's 

imagination; such, for instance, were the barbaric tortures 

inflicted, at the instigation of Theroigne de Mericourt, on La 

Belle Bouquetiere. Yet De Sade played a very peaceful part in the 

events of that time, chiefly as a philanthropist, spending much 

of his time in the hospitals. He saved his parents-in-law from 

the scaffold, although they had always been hostile to him, and 

by his moderation aroused the suspicions of the revolutionary 

party, and was again imprisoned. Later he wrote a pamphlet 

against Napoleon, who never forgave him and had him shut up in 

Charenton as a lunatic; it was a not unusual method at that time 

of disposing of persons whom it was wished to put out of the way, 

and, notwithstanding De Sade's organically abnormal temperament, 

there is no reason to regard him as actually insane. 

Royer-Collard, an eminent alienist of that period, then at the 

head of Charenton, declared De Sade to be sane, and his detailed 

report is still extant. Other specialists were of the same 

opinion. Bloch, who quotes these opinions (_Neue Forschungen_, 

etc., p. 370), says that the only possible conclusion is that De 

Sade was sane, but neurasthenic, and Eulenburg also concludes 

that he cannot be regarded as insane, although he was highly 


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