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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

objects, whereby the person who from such occurrences obtains sexual 

enjoyment may either himself be the direct cause, or cause them to take 

place by means of other persons, or merely be the spectator, or, finally, 

be, voluntarily or involuntarily, the object against which these processes 

are directed."[87] This definition of sadism as found in De Sade's works 

is thus, more especially by its final clause, a very much wider conception 

than the usual definition. 

 

Donatien Alphonse Francois, Marquis De Sade, was born in 1740 at 

Paris in the house of the great Conde. He belonged to a very 

noble, ancient, and distinguished Provencal family; Petrarch's 

Laura, who married a De Sade, was one of his ancestors, and the 

family had cultivated both arms and letters with success. He was, 

according to Lacroix, "an adorable youth whose delicately pale 

and dusky face, lighted up by two large black [according to 

another account blue] eyes, already bore the languorous imprint 

of the vice which was to corrupt his whole being"; his voice was 

"drawling and caressing"; his gait had "a softly feminine grace." 

Unfortunately there is no authentic portrait of him. His early 

life is sketched in letter iv of his _Aline et Valcourt_. On 

leaving the College-Louis-le-Grand he became a cavalry officer 

and went through the Seven Years' War in Germany. There can be 

little doubt that the experiences of his military life, working 

on a femininely vicious temperament, had much to do with the 

development of his perversion. He appears to have got into 

numerous scrapes, of which the details are unknown, and his 

father sought to marry him to the daughter of an aristocratic 

friend of his own, a noble and amiable girl of 20. It so chanced 

that when young De Sade first went to the house of his future 

wife only her younger sister, a girl of 13, was at home; with her 

he at once fell in love and his love was reciprocated; they were 

both musical enthusiasts, and she had a beautiful voice. The 

parents insisted on carrying out the original scheme of marriage. 

De Sade's wife loved him, and, in spite of everything, served his 

interests with Griselda-like devotion; she was, Ginisty remarks, 

a saint, a saint of conjugal life; but her love was from the 

first only requited with repulsion, contempt, and suspicion. 

There were, however, children of the marriage; the career of the 

eldest--an estimable young man who went into the army and also 

had artistic ability, but otherwise had no community of tastes 

with his father--has been sketched by Paul Ginisty, who has also 

edited the letters of the Marquise. De Sade's passion for the 

younger sister continued (he idealized her as Juliette), though 

she was placed in a convent beyond his reach, and at a much later 

period he eloped with her and spent perhaps the happiest period 

of his life, soon terminated by her death. It is evident that 

this unhappy marriage was decisive in determining De Sade's 

career; he at once threw himself recklessly into every form of 

dissipation, spending his health and his substance sometimes 

among refinedly debauched nobles and sometimes among coarsely 

debauched lackeys. He was, however, always something of an 

artist, something of a student, something of a philosopher, and 

at an early period he began to write, apparently at the age of 

23. It was at this age, and only a few months after his marriage, 

that on account of some excess he was for a time confined in 

Vincennes. He was destined to spend 27 years of his life in 

prisons, if we include the 13 years which in old age he passed in 

the asylum at Charenton. His actual offenses were by no means so 

terrible as those he loved to dwell on in imagination, and for 

the most part they have been greatly exaggerated. His most 


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