Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

delight in suffering pain--however careful and qualified the position I 

have taken--many estimable people will cry out that I am degrading a whole 

sex and generally supporting the "subjection of women." But the day for 

academic discussion concerning the "subjection of women" has gone by. The 

tendency I have sought to make clear is too well established by the 

experience of normal and typical women--however numerous the exceptions 

may be--to be called in question. I would point out to those who would 

deprecate the influence of such facts in relation to social progress that 

nothing is gained by regarding women as simply men of smaller growth. They 

are not so; they have the laws of their own nature; their development must 

be along their own lines, and not along masculine lines. It is as true now 

as in Bacon's day that we only learn to command nature by obeying her. To 

ignore facts is to court disappointment in our measure of progress. The 

particular fact with which we have here come in contact is very vital and 

radical, and most subtle in its influence. It is foolish to ignore it; we 

must allow for its existence. We can neither attain a sane view of life 

nor a sane social legislation of life unless we possess a just and 

accurate knowledge of the fundamental instincts upon which life is built. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[61] Various mammals, carried away by the reckless fury of the sexual 

impulse, are apt to ill-treat their females (R. Mueller, _Sexualbiologie_, 

p. 123). This treatment is, however, usually only an incident of 

courtship, the result of excess of ardor. "The chaffinches and 

saffron-finches (_Fringella_ and _Sycalis_) are very rough wooers," says 

A.G. Butler (_Zooelogist_, 1902, p. 241); "they sing vociferously, and 

chase their hens violently, knocking them over in their flight, pursuing 

and savagely pecking them even on the ground; but when once the hens 

become submissive, the males change their tactics, and become for the time 

model husbands, feeding their wives from their crop, and assisting in 

rearing the young." 

 

[62] Cf. A.C. Haddon, _Head Hunters_, p. 107. 

 

[63] Marro considers that there may be transference of emotion,--the 

impulse of violence generated in the male by his rivals being turned 

against his partner,--according to a tendency noted by Sully and 

illustrated by Ribot in his _Psychology of the Emotions_, part i, chapter 

xii. 

 

[64] Several writers have found in the facts of primitive animal courtship 

the explanation of the connection between love and pain. Thus, 

Krafft-Ebing (_Psychopathia Sexualis_, English translation of tenth German 

edition, p. 80) briefly notes that outbreaks of sadism are possibly 

atavistic. Marro (_La Puberta_, 1898, p. 219 et seq.) has some suggestive 

pages on this subject. It would appear that this explanation was vaguely 

outlined by Jaeger. Laserre, in a Bordeaux thesis mentioned by Fere, has 

argued in the same sense. Fere (_L'Instinct Sexuel_, p. 134), on grounds 

that are scarcely sufficient, regards this explanation as merely a 

superficial analogy. But it is certainly not a complete explanation. 

 

[65] Schaefer (_Jahrbuecher fuer Psychologie_, Bd. ii, p. 128, and quoted 

by Krafft-Ebing in _Psychopathia Sexualis_), in connection with a case in 

which sexual excitement was produced by the sight of battles or of 

paintings of them, remarks: "The pleasure of battle and murder is so 

predominantly an attribute of the male sex throughout the animal kingdom 

that there can be no question about the close connection between this side 

of the masculine character and male sexuality. I believe that I can show 

by observation that in men who are absolutely normal, mentally and 

physically, the first indefinite and incomprehensible precursors of sexual 

excitement may be induced by reading exciting scenes of chase and war. 

These give rise to unconscious longings for a kind of satisfaction in 

warlike games (wrestling, etc.) which express the fundamental sexual 


Page 3 from 5:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   Forward