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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

may desire to be forced, to be roughly forced, to be ravished away beyond 

her own will. But all the time she only desires to be forced toward those 

things which are essentially and profoundly agreeable to her. A man who 

fails to realize this has made little progress in the art of love. "I like 

being knocked about and made to do things I don't want to do," a woman 

said, but she admitted, on being questioned, that she would not like to 

have _much_ pain inflicted, and that she might not care to be made to do 

important things she did not want to do. The story of Griselda's unbounded 

submissiveness can scarcely be said to be psychologically right, though it 

has its artistic rightness as an elaborate fantasia on this theme 

justified by its conclusion. 

 

This point is further illustrated by the following passage from a 

letter written by a lady: "Submission to the man's will is still, 

and always must be, the prelude to pleasure, and the association 

of ideas will probably always produce this much misunderstood 

instinct. Now, I find, indirectly from other women and directly 

from my own experience, that, when the point in dispute is very 

important and the man exerts his authority, the desire to get 

one's own way completely obliterates the sexual feeling, while, 

conversely, in small things the sexual feeling obliterates the 

desire to have one's own way. Where the two are nearly equal a 

conflict between them ensues, and I can stand aside and wonder 

which will get the best of it, though I encourage the sexual 

feeling when possible, as, if the other conquers, it leaves a 

sense of great mental irritation and physical discomfort. A man 

should command in small things, as in nine cases out of ten this 

will produce excitement. He should _advise_ in large matters, or 

he may find either that he is unable to enforce his orders or 

that he produces a feeling of dislike and annoyance he was far 

from intending. Women imagine men must be stronger than 

themselves to excite their passion. I disagree. A passionate man 

has the best chance, for in him the primitive instincts are 

strong. The wish to subdue the female is one of them, and in 

small things he will exert his authority to make her feel his 

power, while she knows that on a question of real importance she 

has a good chance of getting her own way by working on his 

greater susceptibility. Perhaps an illustration will show what I 

mean. I was listening to the band and a girl and her _fiance_ 

came up to occupy two seats near me. The girl sank into one seat, 

but for some reason the man wished her to take the other. She 

refused. He repeated his order twice, the second time so 

peremptorily that she changed places, and I heard him say: 'I 

don't think you heard what I said. I don't expect to give an 

order three times.' 

 

"This little scene interested me, and I afterward asked the girl 

the following questions:-- 

 

"'Had you any reason for taking one chair more than the other?' 

 

"'No.' 

 

"'Did Mr. ----'s insistence on your changing give you any 

pleasure?' 

 

"'Yes' (after a little hesitation). 

 

"'Why?' 

 

"'I don't know.' 

 

"'Would it have done so if you had particularly wished to sit in 

that chair; if, for instance, you had had a boil on your cheek 

and wished to turn that side away from him?' 

 

"'No; certainly not. The worry of thinking he was looking at it 

would have made me too cross to feel pleased.' 

 

"Does this explain what I mean? The occasion, by the way, need 

not be really important, but, as in this imaginary case of the 

boil, if it _seems important_ to the woman, irritation will 

outweigh the physical sensation." 

 

I am well aware that in thus asserting a certain tendency in women to 


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