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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

It may seem that such impulses and such devices to gratify them 

are altogether unnatural. This is not so. They have a zooelogical 

basis and in many animals are embodied in the anatomical 

structure. Many rodents, ruminants, and some of the carnivora 

show natural developments of the penis closely resembling some of 

those artificially adopted by man. Thus the guinea-pigs possess 

two horny styles attached to the penis, while the glans of the 

penis is covered with sharp spines. Some of the Caviidae also have 

two sharp, horny saws at the side of the penis. The cat, the 

rhinoceros, the tapir, and other animals possess projecting 

structures on the penis, and some species of ruminants, such as 

the sheep, the giraffe, and many antelopes, have, attached to the 

penis, long filiform processes through which the urethra passes. 

(F.H.A. Marshall, _The Physiology of Reproduction_, pp. 246-248.) 

 

 

We find, even in creatures so delicate and ethereal as the 

butterflies, a whole armory of keen weapons for use in coitus. 

These were described in detail in an elaborate and fully 

illustrated memoir by P.H. Gosse ("On the Clasping Organs 

Ancillary to Generation in Certain Groups of the Lepidoptera," 

_Transactions of the Linnaean Society_, second series, vol. ii, 

Zooelogy, 1882). These organs, which Gosse terms _harpes_ (or 

grappling irons), are found in the Papilionidae and are very 

beautiful and varied, taking the forms of projecting claws, 

hooks, pikes, swords, knobs, and strange combinations of these, 

commonly brought to a keen edge and then cut into sharp teeth. 

 

It is probable that all these structures serve to excite the 

sexual apparatus of the female and to promote tumescence. 

 

To the careless observer there may seem to be something vicious 

or perverted in such manifestations in man. That opinion becomes 

very doubtful when we consider how these tendencies occur in 

people living under natural conditions in widely separated parts 

of the world. It becomes still further untenable if we are 

justified in believing that the ancestors of men possessed 

projecting epithelial appendages attached to the penis, and if we 

accept the discovery by Friedenthal of the rudiment of these 

appendages on the penis of the human fetus at an early stage 

(Friedenthal, "Sonderformen der menschlichen Leibesbildung," 

_Sexual-Probleme_, Feb., 1912, p. 129). In this case human 

ingenuity would merely be seeking to supply an organ which nature 

has ceased to furnish, although it is still in some cases needed, 

especially among peoples whose aptitude for erethism has remained 

at, or fallen to, a subhuman level. 

 

At first sight the connection between love and pain--the tendency of men 

to delight in inflicting it and women in suffering it--seems strange and 

inexplicable. It seems amazing that a tender and even independent woman 

should maintain a passionate attachment to a man who subjects her to 

physical and moral insults, and that a strong man, often intelligent, 

reasonable, and even kind-hearted, should desire to subject to such 

insults a woman whom he loves passionately and who has given him every 

final proof of her own passion. In understanding such cases we have to 

remember that it is only within limits that a woman really enjoys the 

pain, discomfort, or subjection to which she submits. A little pain which 

the man knows he can himself soothe, a little pain which the woman gladly 

accepts as the sign and forerunner of pleasure--this degree of pain comes 

within the normal limits of love and is rooted, as we have seen, in the 

experience of the race. But when it is carried beyond these limits, though 

it may still be tolerated because of the support it receives from its 

biological basis, it is no longer enjoyed. The natural note has been too 

violently struck, and the rhythm of love has ceased to be perfect. A woman 


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