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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Indians of the northern and more especially of the southern continents. 

Amerigo Vespucci and other early travelers noted the existence of some of 

these appliances, and since Miklucho-Macleay carefully described them as 

used in Borneo[82] their existence has been generally recognized. They are 

usually regarded merely as ethnological curiosities. As such they would 

not concern us here. Their real significance for us is that they 

illustrate the comparative insensitiveness of the genital canal in women, 

while at the same time they show that a certain amount of what we cannot 

but regard as painful stimulation is craved by women, in order to heighten 

tumescence and increase sexual pleasure, even though it can only by 

procured by artificial methods. It is, of course, possible to argue that 

in these cases we are not concerned with pain at all, but with a strong 

stimulation that is felt as purely pleasurable. There can be no doubt, 

however, that in the absence of sexual excitement this stimulation would 

be felt as purely painful, and--in the light of our previous 

discussion--we may, perhaps, fairly regard it as a painful stimulation 

which is craved, not because it is itself pleasurable, but because it 

heightens the highly pleasurable state of tumescence. 

 

Borneo, the geographical center of the Indonesian world, appears 

also to be the district in which these instruments are most 

popular. The _ampallang, palang, kambion_, or _sprit-sail yard_, 

as it is variously termed, is a little rod of bone or metal 

nearly two inches in length, rounded at the ends, and used by the 

Kyans and Dyaks of Borneo. Before coitus it is inserted into a 

transverse orifice in the penis, made by a painful and somewhat 

dangerous operation and kept open by a quill. Two or more of 

these instruments are occasionally worn. Sometimes little brushes 

are attached to each end of the instrument. Another instrument, 

used by the Dyaks, but said to have been borrowed from the 

Malays, is the _palang anus_, which is a ring or collar of 

plaited palm-fiber, furnished with a pair of stiffish horns of 

the same wiry material; it is worn on the neck of the glans and 

fits tight to the skin so as not to slip off. (Brooke Low, "The 

Natives of Borneo," _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, 

August and November, 1892, p. 45; the _ampallang_ and similar 

instruments are described by Ploss and Bartels, _Das Weib_, Bd. 

i, chapter xvii; also in _Untrodden Fields of Anthropology_, by a 

French army surgeon, 1898, vol. ii, pp. 135-141; also Mantegazza, 

_Gli Amori degli Uomini_, French translation, p. 83 et seq.) 

Riedel informed Miklucho-Macleay that in the Celebes the Alfurus 

fasten the eyelids of goats with the eyelashes round the corona 

of the glans penis, and in Java a piece of goatskin is used in a 

similar way, so as to form a hairy sheath (_Zeitschrift fuer 

Ethnologie_, 1876, pp. 22-25), while among the Batta, of Sumatra, 

Hagen found that small stones are inserted by an incision under 

the skin of the penis (_Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1891, ht. 3, 

p. 351). 

 

In the Malay peninsula Stevens found instruments somewhat similar 

to the _ampallang_ still in use among some tribes, and among 

others formerly in use. He thinks they were brought from Borneo. 

(H.V. Stevens, _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1896, ht. 4, p. 

181.) Bloch, who brings forward other examples of similar devices 

(_Beitraege zur AEtiologie der Psychopathia Sexualis_, pp. 56-58), 

considers that the Australian mica operation may thus in part be 

explained. 

 

Such instruments are not, however, entirely unknown in Europe. In 

France, in the eighteenth century, it appears that rings, 

sometimes set with hard knobs, and called "aides," were 

occasionally used by men to heighten the pleasure of women in 


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