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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

easily reproduce the definite sensation of the pain, and thus the 

whole memory is disintegrated and speedily forgotten. It is quite 

otherwise with moral suffering, which persists in memory and has 

far more influence on conduct. No one wishes to suffer moral pain 

or has any pleasure even in the idea of suffering it. 

 

It is the presence of this essential tendency which leads to a certain 

apparent contradiction in a woman's emotions. On the one hand, rooted in 

the maternal instinct, we find pity, tenderness, and compassion; on the 

other hand, rooted in the sexual instinct, we find a delight in roughness, 

violence, pain, and danger, sometimes in herself, sometimes also in 

others. The one impulse craves something innocent and helpless, to cherish 

and protect; the other delights in the spectacle of recklessness, 

audacity, sometimes even effrontery.[79] A woman is not perfectly happy in 

her lover unless he can give at least some satisfaction to each of these 

two opposite longings. 

 

The psychological satisfaction which women tend to feel in a certain 

degree of pain in love is strictly co-ordinated with a physical fact. 

Women possess a minor degree of sensibility in the sexual region. This 

fact must not be misunderstood. On the one hand, it by no means begs the 

question as to whether women's sensibility generally is greater or less 

than that of men; this is a disputed question and the evidence is still 

somewhat conflicting.[80] On the other hand, it also by no means involves 

a less degree of specific sexual pleasure in women, for the tactile 

sensibility of the sexual organs is no index to the specific sexual 

sensibility of those organs when in a state of tumescence. The real 

significance of the less tactile sensibility of the genital region in 

women is to be found in parturition and the special liability of the 

sexual region in women to injury.[81] The women who are less sensitive in 

this respect would be better able and more willing to endure the risks of 

childbirth, and would therefore tend to supplant those who were more 

sensitive. But, as a by-product of this less degree of sensibility, we 

have a condition in which physical irritation amounting even to pain may 

become to normal women in the state of extreme tumescence a source of 

pleasurable excitement, such as it would rarely be to normal men. 

 

To Calmann appear to be due the first carefully made observations 

showing the minor sensibility of the genital tract in women. 

(Adolf Calmann, "Sensibilituetsprufungen am weiblicken Genitale 

nach forensichen Gesichtspunkten," _Archiv fuer Gynaekologie_, 

1898, p. 454.) He investigated the vagina, urethra, and anus in 

eighteen women and found a great lack of sensibility, least 

marked in anus, and most marked in vagina. [This distribution of 

the insensitiveness alone indicates that it is due, as I have 

suggested, to natural selection.] Sometimes a finger in the 

vagina could not be felt at all. One woman, when a catheter was 

introduced into the anus, said it might be the vagina or urethra, 

but was certainly not the anus. (Calmann remarks that he was 

careful to put his questions in an intelligible form.) The women 

were only conscious of the urine being drawn off when they heard 

the familiar sound of the stream or when the bladder was very 

full; if the sound of the stream was deadened by a towel they 

were quite unconscious that the bladder had been emptied. [In 

confirmation of this statement I have noticed that in a lady 

whose distended bladder it was necessary to empty by the catheter 

shortly before the birth of her first child--but who had, indeed, 

been partly under the influence of chloroform--there was no 

consciousness of the artificial relief; she merely remarked that 

she thought she could now relieve herself.] There was some sense 


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