Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

It must therefore be said that, in so far as pain is pleasurable, 

it is so only in so far as it is recognized as a prelude to 

pleasure, or else when it is an actual stimulus to the nerves 

conveying the sensation of pleasure. The nymphomaniac who 

experienced an orgasm at the moment when the knife passed through 

her clitoris (as recorded by Mantegazza) and the prostitute who 

experienced keen pleasure when the surgeon removed vegetations 

from her vulva (as recorded by Fere) took no pleasure in pain, 

but in one case the intense craving for strong sexual emotion, 

and in the other the long-blunted nerves of pleasure, welcomed 

the abnormally strong impulse; and the pain of the incision, if 

felt at all, was immediately swallowed up in the sensation of 

pleasure. Moll remarks (_Kontraere Sexualempfindung_, third 

edition, p. 278) that even in man a trace of physical pain may be 

normally combined with sexual pleasure, when the vagina 

contracts on the penis at the moment of ejaculation, the pain, 

when not too severe, being almost immediately felt as pleasure. 

That there is no pleasure in the actual pain, even in masochism, 

is indicated by the following statement which Krafft-Ebing gives 

as representing the experiences of a masochist (_Psychopathia 

Sexualis_ English translation, p. 201): "The relation is not of 

such a nature that what causes physical pain is simply perceived 

as physical pleasure, for the person in a state of masochistic 

ecstasy feels no pain, either because by reason of his emotional 

state (like that of the soldier in battle) the physical effect on 

his cutaneous nerves is not apperceived, or because (as with 

religious martyrs and enthusiasts) in the preoccupation of 

consciousness with sexual emotion the idea of maltreatment 

remains merely a symbol, without its quality of pain. To a 

certain extent there is overcompensation of physical pain in 

psychic pleasure, and only the excess remains in consciousness as 

psychic lust. This also undergoes an increase, since, either 

through reflex spinal influence or through a peculiar coloring in 

the sensorium of sensory impressions, a kind of hallucination of 

bodily pleasure takes place, with a vague localization of the 

objectively projected sensation. In the self-torture of religious 

enthusiasts (fakirs, howling dervishes, religious flagellants) 

there is an analogous state, only with a difference in the 

quality of pleasurable feeling. Here the conception of martyrdom 

is also apperceived without its pain, for consciousness is filled 

with the pleasurably colored idea of serving God, atoning for 

sins, deserving Heaven, etc., through martyrdom." This statement 

cannot be said to clear up the matter entirely; but it is fairly 

evident that, when a woman says that she finds pleasure in the 

pain inflicted by a lover, she means that under the special 

circumstances she finds pleasure in treatment which would at 

other times be felt as pain, or else that the slight real pain 

experienced is so quickly followed by overwhelming pleasure that 

in memory the pain itself seems to have been pleasure and may 

even be regarded as the symbol of pleasure. 

 

There is a special peculiarity of physical pain, which may be 

well borne in mind in considering the phenomena now before us, 

for it helps to account for the tolerance with which the idea of 

pain is regarded. I refer to the great ease with which physical 

pain is forgotten, a fact well known to all mothers, or to all 

who have been present at the birth of a child. As Professor von 

Tschisch points out ("Der Schmerz," _Zeitschrift fuer Psychologie 

und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane_, Bd. xxvi, ht. 1 and 2, 1901), 

memory can only preserve impressions as a whole; physical pain 

consists of a sensation and of a feeling. But memory cannot 


Page 1 from 5: [1]  2   3   4   5   Forward