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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

pleasurable, but must be associated with something to be gained 

by it. My experience is that it [coitus] does often hurt for a 

few moments, but that passes and the rest is easy; so that the 

little hurt is nothing terrible, but all the same annoying if 

only for the sake of a few minutes' pleasure, which is not long 

enough. I do not know how my experience compares with other 

women's, but I feel sure that in my case the time needed is 

longer than usual, and the longer the better, always, with me. As 

to liking pain--no, I do not really like it, although I can 

tolerate pain very well, of any kind; but I like to feel force 

and strength; this is usual, I think, women being--or supposed to 

be--passive in love. I have not found that 'pain at once kills 

pleasure.'" 

 

Again, another lady briefly states that, for her, pain has a 

mental fascination, and that such pain as she has had she has 

liked, but that, if it had been any stronger, pleasure would have 

been destroyed. 

 

The evidence thus seems to point, with various shades of 

gradation, to the conclusion that the idea or even the reality of 

pain in sexual emotion is welcomed by women, provided that this 

element of pain is of small amount and subordinate to the 

pleasure which is to follow it. Unless coitus is fundamentally 

pleasure the element of pain must necessarily be unmitigated 

pain, and a craving for pain unassociated with a greater 

satisfaction to follow it cannot be regarded as normal. 

 

In this connection I may refer to a suggestive chapter on "The 

Enjoyment of Pain" in Hirn's _Origins of Art_. "If we take into 

account," says Hirn, "the powerful stimulating effect which is 

produced by acute pain, we may easily understand why people 

submit to momentary unpleasantness for the sake of enjoying the 

subsequent excitement. This motive leads to the deliberate 

creation, not only of pain-sensations, but also of emotions in 

which pain enters as an element. The violent activity which is 

involved in the reaction against fear, and still more in that 

against anger, affords us a sensation of pleasurable excitement 

which is well worth the cost of the passing unpleasantness. It 

is, moreover, notorious that some persons have developed a 

peculiar art of making the initial pain of anger so transient 

that they can enjoy the active elements in it with almost 

undivided delight. Such an accomplishment is far more difficult 

in the case of sorrow.... The creation of pain-sensations may be 

explained as a desperate device for enhancing the intensity of 

the emotional state." 

 

The relation of pain and pleasure to emotion has been thoroughly 

discussed, I may add, by H.R. Marshall in his _Pain, Pleasure, 

and AEsthetics_. He contends that pleasure and pain are "general 

qualities, one of which must, and either of which may, belong to 

any fixed element of consciousness." "Pleasure," he considers, 

"is experienced whenever the physical activity coincident with 

the psychic state to which the pleasure is attached involves the 

use of surplus stored force." We can see, therefore, how, if pain 

acts as a stimulant to emotion, it becomes the servant of 

pleasure by supplying it with surplus stored force. 

 

This problem of pain is thus one of psychic dynamics. If we 

realize this we shall begin to understand the place of cruelty in 

life. "One ought to learn anew about cruelty," said Nietzsche 

(_Beyond Good and Evil_, 229), "and open one's eyes. Almost 

everything that we call 'higher culture' is based upon the 

spiritualizing and intensifying of _cruelty_.... Then, to be 

sure, we must put aside teaching the blundering psychology of 

former times, which could only teach with regard to cruelty that 


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