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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

and whose work was certainly highly appreciated in the best circles and 

among the most cultivated class of her day--describing as a perfect, wise, 

and courteous knight a man who practically commits a rape on a woman who 

has refused to have anything to do with him, and, in so acting, he wins 

her entire love. The savage beauty of New Caledonia furnishes no better 

illustration of the fascination of force, for she, at all events, has done 

her best to court the violence she undergoes. In Middleton's _Spanish 

Gypsy_ we find exactly the same episode, and the unhappy Portuguese nun 

wrote: "Love me for ever and make me suffer still more." To find in 

literature more attenuated examples of the same tendency is easy. 

Shakespeare, whose observation so little escaped, has seldom depicted the 

adult passion of a grown woman, but in the play which he has mainly 

devoted to this subject he makes Cleopatra refer to "amorous pinches," and 

she says in the end: "The stroke of death is as a lover's pinch, which 

hurts and is desired." "I think the Sabine woman enjoyed being carried off 

like that," a woman remarked in front of Rubens's "Rape of the Sabines," 

confessing that such a method of love-making appealed strongly to 

herself, and it is probable that the majority of women would be prepared 

to echo that remark. 

 

It may be argued that pain cannot give pleasure, and that when 

what would usually be pain is felt as pleasure it cannot be 

regarded as pain at all. It must be admitted that the emotional 

state is often somewhat complex. Moreover, women by no means 

always agree in the statement of their experience. It is 

noteworthy, however, that even when the pleasurableness of pain 

in love is denied it is still admitted that, under some 

circumstances, pain, or the idea of pain, is felt as pleasurable. 

I am indebted to a lady for a somewhat elaborate discussion of 

this subject, which I may here quote at length: "As regards 

physical pain, though the idea of it is sometimes exciting, I 

think the reality is the reverse. A very slight amount of pain 

destroys my pleasure completely. This was the case with me for 

fully a month after marriage, and since. When pain has 

occasionally been associated with passion, pleasure has been 

sensibly diminished. I can imagine that, when there is a want of 

sensitiveness so that the tender kiss or caress might fail to 

give pleasure, more forcible methods are desired; but in that 

case what would be pain to a sensitive person would be only a 

pleasant excitement, and it could not be truly said that such 

obtuse persons liked pain, though they might appear to do so. I 

cannot think that anyone enjoys what is pain _to them_, if only 

from the fact that it detracts and divides the attention. This, 

however, is only my own idea drawn from my own negative 

experience. No woman has ever told me that she would like to have 

pain inflicted on her. On the other hand, the desire to inflict 

pain seems almost universal among men. I have only met one man in 

whom I have never at any time been able to detect it. At the same 

time most men shrink from putting their ideas into practice. A 

friend of my husband finds his chief pleasure in imagining women 

hurt and ill-treated, but is too tender-hearted ever to inflict 

pain on them in reality, even when they are willing to submit to 

it. Perhaps a woman's readiness to submit to pain to please a man 

may sometimes be taken for pleasure in it. Even when women like 

the idea of pain, I fancy it is only because it implies 

subjection to the man, from association with the fact that 

physical pleasure must necessarily be preceded by submission to 

his will." 

 

In a subsequent communication this lady enlarged and perhaps 

somewhat modified her statements on this point:-- 


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