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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

who does not make one suffer a little." Another hysterical woman 

(a silk fetichist, frigid with men) had dreams of men and animals 

abusing her: "I cried with pain and was happy at the same time." 

(Clerambault, _Archives d'Anthropologie Criminelle_, June, 1908, 

p. 442.) 

 

It has been said that among Slavs of the lower class the wives 

feel hurt if they are not beaten by their husbands. Paullinus, in 

the seventeenth century, remarked that Russian women are never 

more pleased and happy than when beaten by their husbands, and 

regard such treatment as proof of love. (See, e.g., C.F. von 

Schlichtegroll, _Sacher-Masoch und der Masochismus_, p. 69.) 

Krafft-Ebing believes that this is true at the present day, and 

adds that it is the same in Hungary, a Hungarian official having 

informed him that the peasant women of the Somogyer Comitate do 

not think they are loved by their husbands until they have 

received the first box on the ear. (Krafft-Ebing, _Psychopathia 

Sexualis_, English translation of the tenth edition, p. 188.) I 

may add that a Russian proverb says "Love your wife like your 

soul and beat her like your _shuba_" (overcoat); and, according 

to another Russian proverb, "a dear one's blows hurt not long." 

At the same time it has been remarked that the domination of men 

by women is peculiarly frequent among the Slav peoples. (V. 

Schlichtegroll, op. cit., p. 23.) Cellini, in an interesting 

passage in his _Life_ (book ii, chapters xxxiv-xxxv), describes 

his own brutal treatment of his model Caterina, who was also his 

mistress, and the pleasure which, to his surprise, she took in 

it. Dr. Simon Forman, also, the astrologist, tells in his 

_Autobiography_ (p. 7) how, as a young and puny apprentice to a 

hosier, he was beaten, scolded, and badly treated by the servant 

girl, but after some years of this treatment he turned on her, 

beat her black and blue, and ever after "Mary would do for him 

all that she could." 

That it is a sign of love for a man to beat his sweetheart, and a 

sign much appreciated by women, is illustrated by the episode of 

Cariharta and Repolido, in "Rinconete and Cortadillo," one of 

Cervantes's _Exemplary Novels_. The Indian women of South 

America feel in the same way, and Mantegazza when traveling in 

Bolivia found that they complained when they were not beaten by 

their husbands, and that a girl was proud when she could say "He 

loves me greatly, for he often beats me." (_Fisiologia della 

Donna_, chapter xiii.) The same feeling evidently existed in 

classic antiquity, for we find Lucian, in his "Dialogues of 

Courtesans," makes a woman say: "He who has not rained blows on 

his mistress and torn her hair and her garments is not yet in 

love," while Ovid advises lovers sometimes to be angry with their 

sweethearts and to tear their dresses. 

 

Among the Italian Camorrista, according to Russo, wives are very 

badly treated. Expression is given to this fact in the popular 

songs. But the women only feel themselves tenderly loved when 

they are badly treated by their husbands; the man who does not 

beat them they look upon as a fool. It is the same in the east 

end of London. "If anyone has doubts as to the brutalities 

practised on women by men," writes a London magistrate, "let him 

visit the London Hospital on a Saturday night. Very terrible 

sights will meet his eye. Sometimes as many as twelve or fourteen 

women may be seen seated in the receiving room, waiting for their 

bruised and bleeding faces and bodies to be attended to. In nine 

cases out of ten the injuries have been inflicted by brutal and 

perhaps drunken husbands. The nurses tell me, however, that any 

remarks they may make reflecting on the aggressors are received 


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