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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

normal method of heightening tumescence. Vatsyayana has a 

chapter "On Various Manners of Striking," and he approves of the 

man striking the woman on the back, belly, flanks, and buttocks, 

before and during coitus, as a kind of play, increasing as sexual 

excitement increases, which the woman, with cries and groans, 

pretends to bid the man to stop. It is mentioned that, especially 

in southern India, various instruments (scissors, needles, etc.) 

are used in striking, but this practice is condemned as barbarous 

and dangerous. (_Kama Sutra_, French translation, iii, chapter 

v.) 

 

In the story of Aladdin, in the _Arabian Nights_, the bride is 

undressed by the mother and the other women, who place her in the 

bridegroom's bed "as if by force, and, according to the custom of 

the newly married, she pretends to resist, twisting herself in 

every direction, and seeking to escape from their hands." (_Les 

Mille Nuits_, tr. Mardrus, vol. xi, p. 253.) 

 

It is said that in those parts of Germany where preliminary 

_Probenaechte_ before formal marriage are the rule it is not 

uncommon for a young woman before finally giving herself to a man 

to provoke him to a physical struggle. If she proves stronger she 

dismisses him; if he is stronger she yields herself willingly. 

(W. Henz, "Probenaechte," _Sexual-Probleme_, Oct., 1910, p. 743.) 

 

Among the South Slavs of Servia and Bulgaria, according to 

Krauss, it is the custom to win a woman by seizing her by the 

ankle and bringing her to the ground by force. This method of 

wooing is to the taste of the woman, and they are refractory to 

any other method. The custom of beating or being beaten before 

coitus is also found among the South Slavs. (Kryptadia, vol. vi, 

p. 209.) 

 

In earlier days violent courtship was viewed with approval in the 

European world, even among aristocratic circles. Thus in the 

medieval _Lai de Graelent_ of Marie de France this Breton knight 

is represented as very chaste, possessing a high ideal of love 

and able to withstand the wiles of women. One day when he is 

hunting in a forest he comes upon a naked damsel bathing, 

together with her handmaidens. Overcome by her beauty, he seizes 

her clothes in case she should be alarmed, but is persuaded to 

hand them to her; then he proceeds to make love to her. She 

replies that his love is an insult to a woman of her high 

lineage. Finding her so proud, Graelent sees that his prayers are 

in vain. He drags her by force into the depth of the forest, has 

his will of her, and begs her very gently not to be angry, 

promising to love her loyally and never to leave her. The damsel 

saw that he was a good knight, courteous, and wise. She thought 

within herself that if she were to leave him she would never find 

a better friend. 

 

Brantome mentions a lady who confessed that she liked to be 

"half-forced" by her husband, and he remarks that a woman who is 

"a little difficult and resists" gives more pleasure also to her 

lover than one who yields at once, just as a hard-fought battle 

is a more notable triumph than an easily won victory. (Brantome, 

_Vie des Dames Galantes_, discours i.) Restif de la Bretonne, 

again, whose experience was extensive, wrote in his 

_Anti-Justine_ that "all women of strong temperament like a sort 

of brutality in sexual intercourse and its accessories." 

 

Ovid had said that a little force is pleasing to a woman, and 

that she is grateful to the ravisher against whom she struggles 

(_Ars Amatoria_, lib. i). One of Janet's patients (Raymond and 

Janet, _Les Obsessions et la Psychasthenie_, vol. ii, p. 406) 

complained that her husband was too good, too devoted. "He does 

not know how to make me suffer a little. One cannot love anyone 


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