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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

As regards capture of women among Central Australian tribes, 

Spencer and Gillen remark: "We have never in any of these central 

tribes met with any such thing, and the clubbing part of the 

story may be dismissed, so far as the central area of the 

continent is concerned. To the casual observer what looks like a 

capture (we are, of course, only speaking of these tribes) is in 

reality an elopement, in which the woman is an aiding and 

abetting party." (_Northern Tribes of Central Australia_. p. 32.) 

 

"The New Zealand method of courtship and matrimony is a most 

extraordinary one. A man sees a woman whom he fancies he should 

like for a wife; he asks the consent of her father, or, if an 

orphan, of her nearest relative, which, if he obtain, he carries 

his intended off by force, she resisting with all her strength, 

and, as the New Zealand girls are generally fairly robust, 

sometimes a dreadful struggle takes place; both are soon stripped 

to the skin and it is sometimes the work of hours to remove the 

fair prize a hundred yards. It sometimes happens that she secures 

her retreat into her father's house, and the lover loses all 

chance of ever obtaining her." (A. Earle, _Narratives of 

Residence in New Zealand_, 1832, p. 244.) 

 

Among the Eskimos (probably near Smith Sound) "there is no 

marriage ceremony further than that the boy is required to carry 

off his bride by main force, for even among these blubber-eating 

people the woman only saves her modesty by a show of resistance, 

although she knows years beforehand that her destiny is sealed 

and that she is to become the wife of the man from whose 

embraces, when the nuptial day comes, she is obliged by the 

inexorable law of public opinion to free herself, if possible, by 

kicking and screaming with might and main until she is safely 

landed in the hut of her future lord, when she gives up the 

combat very cheerfully and takes possession of her new abode. The 

betrothal often takes place at a very early period of life and at 

very dissimilar ages." Marriage only takes place when the lover 

has killed his first seal; this is the test of manhood and 

maturity. (J.J. Hayes, _Open Polar Sea_, 1867, p. 432.) 

 

Marriage by "capture" is common in war and raiding in central 

Africa. "The women, as a rule," Johnston says, "make no very 

great resistance on these occasions. It is almost like playing a 

game. A woman is surprised as she goes to get water at the 

stream, or when she is on the way to or from the plantation. The 

man has only got to show her she is cornered and that escape is 

not easy or pleasant and she submits to be carried off. As a 

general rule, they seem to accept very cheerfully these abrupt 

changes in their matrimonial existence." (Sir H.H. Johnston, 

_British Central Africa_, p. 412.) 

 

Among the wild tribes of the Malay Peninsula in one form of 

wedding rite the bridegroom is required to run seven times around 

an artificial mound decorated with flowers and the emblem of the 

people's religion. In the event of the bridegroom failing to 

catch the bride the marriage has to be postponed. Among the Orang 

Laut, or sea-gipsies, the pursuit sometimes takes the form of a 

canoe-race; the woman is given a good start and must be overtaken 

before she has gone a certain distance. (W.W. Skeat, _Journal 

Anthropological Institute_, Jan.-June, 1902, p. 134; Skeat and 

Blagden, _Pagan Races of the Malay_, vol. ii, p. 69 et seq., 

fully discuss the ceremony around the mound.) 

 

"Calmuck women ride better than the men. A male Calmuck on 

horseback looks as if he was intoxicated, and likely to fall off 

every instant, though he never loses his seat; but the women sit 

with more ease, and ride with extraordinary skill. The ceremony 


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