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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

According to the second set of theories, the capture is not real, but 

simulated, and may be accounted for by psychological reasons. Fustel de 

Coulanges, in _La Cite Antique_,[68] discussing simulated marriage by 

capture among the Romans, mentioned the view that it was "a symbol of the 

young girl's modesty," but himself regarded it as an act of force to 

symbolize the husband's power. He was possibly alluding to Herbert 

Spencer, who suggested a psychological explanation of the apparent 

prevalence of marriage by capture based on the supposition that, capturing 

a wife being a proof of bravery, such a method of obtaining a wife would 

be practised by the strongest men and be admired, while, on the other 

hand, he considered that "female coyness" was "an important factor" in 

constituting the more formal kinds of marriage by capture ceremonial.[69] 

Westermarck, while accepting true marriage by capture, considers that 

Spencer's statement "can scarcely be disproved."[70] In his valuable study 

of certain aspects of primitive marriage Crawley, developing the 

explanation rejected by Fustel de Coulanges, regards the fundamental fact 

to be the modesty of women, which has to be neutralized, and this is done 

by "a ceremonial use of force, which is half real and half make-believe." 

Thus the manifestations are not survivals, but "arising in a natural way 

from normal human feelings. It is not the tribe from which the bride is 

abducted, nor, primarily, her family and kindred, but her _sex_"; and her 

"sexual characters of timidity, bashfulness, and passivity are 

sympathetically overcome by make-believe representations of male 

characteristic actions."[71] 

 

It is not necessary for the present purpose that either of these two 

opposing theories concerning the origin of the customs and feelings we are 

here concerned with should be definitely rejected. Whichever theory is 

adopted, the fundamental psychic element which here alone concerns us 

still exists intact.[72] It may be pointed out, however, that we probably 

have to accept two groups of such phenomena: one, seldom or never existing 

as the sole form of marriage, in which the capture is real; and another in 

which the "capture" is more or less ceremonial or playful. The two groups 

coexist among the Turcomans, as described by Vambery, who are constantly 

capturing and enslaving the Persians of both sexes, and, side by side with 

this, have a marriage ceremonial of mock-capture of entirely playful 

character. At the same time the two groups sometimes overlap, as is 

indicated by cases in which, while the "capture" appears to be ceremonial, 

the girl is still allowed to escape altogether if she wishes. The 

difficulty of disentangling the two groups is shown by the fact that so 

careful an investigator as Westermarck cites cases of real capture and 

mock-capture together without attempting to distinguish between them. From 

our present point of view it is quite unnecessary to attempt such a 

distinction. Whether the capture is simulated or real, the man is still 

playing the masculine and aggressive part proper to the male; the woman is 

still playing the feminine and defensive part proper to the female. The 

universal prevalence of these phenomena is due to the fact that 

manifestations of this kind, real or pretended, afford each sex the very 

best opportunity for playing its proper part in courtship, and so, even 

when the force is real, must always gratify a profound instinct. 

 

It is not necessary to quote examples of marriage by capture from 

the numerous and easily accessible books on the evolution of 

marriage. (Sir A.B. Ellis, adopting MacLennan's standpoint, 

presented a concise statement of the facts in an article on 

"Survivals from Marriage by Capture," _Popular Science Monthly_, 

1891, p. 207.) It may, however, be worth while to bring together 

from scattered sources a few of the facts concerning the 


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