Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

Nor is it only in play that the connection between love and combativity 

may still be traced. With the epoch of the first sexual relationship, 

Marro points out, awakes the instinct of cruelty, which prompts the youth 

to acts which are sometimes in absolute contrast to his previous conduct, 

and leads him to be careless of the lives of others as well as of his own 

life.[66] Marro presents a diagram showing how crimes against the person 

in Italy rise rapidly from the age of 16 to 20 and reach a climax between 

21 and 25. In Paris, Gamier states, crimes of blood are six times more 

frequent in adolescents (aged 16 to 20) than in adults. It is the same 

elsewhere.[67] This tendency to criminal violence during the age-period of 

courtship is a by-product of the sexual impulse, a kind of tertiary sexual 

character. 

 

In the process of what is commonly termed "marriage by capture" we have a 

method of courtship which closely resembles the most typical form of 

animal courtship, and is yet found in all but the highest and most 

artificial stages of human society. It may not be true that, as MacLennan 

and others have argued, almost every race of man has passed through an 

actual stage of marriage by capture, but the phenomena in question have 

certainly been extremely widespread and exist in popular custom even among 

the highest races today. George Sand has presented a charming picture of 

such a custom, existing in France, in her _Mare au Diable_. Farther away, 

among the Kirghiz, the young woman is pursued by all her lovers, but she 

is armed with a formidable whip, which she does not hesitate to use if 

overtaken by a lover to whom she is not favorable. Among the Malays, 

according to early travelers, courtship is carried on in the water in 

canoes with double-bladed paddles; or, if no water is near, the damsel, 

stripped naked of all but a waistband, is given a certain start and runs 

off on foot followed by her lover. Vaughan Stevens in 1896 reported that 

this performance is merely a sport; but Skeat and Blagden, in their more 

recent and very elaborate investigations in the Malay States, find that it 

is a rite. 

 

Even if we regard "marriage by capture" as simply a primitive human 

institution stimulated by tribal exigencies and early social conditions, 

yet, when we recall its widespread and persistent character, its close 

resemblance to the most general method of courtship among animals, and the 

emotional tendencies which still persist even in the most civilized men 

and women, we have to recognize that we are in presence of a real 

psychological impulse which cannot fail in its exercise to introduce some 

element of pain into love. 

 

There are, however, two fundamentally different theories concerning 

"marriage by capture." According to the first, that of MacLennan, which, 

until recently, has been very widely accepted, and to which Professor 

Tylor has given the weight of his authority, there has really been in 

primitive society a recognized stage in which marriages were effected by 

the capture of the wife. Such a state of things MacLennan regarded as once 

world-wide. There can be no doubt that women very frequently have been 

captured in this way among primitive peoples. Nor, indeed, has the custom 

been confined to savages. In Europe we find that even up to comparatively 

recent times the abduction of women was not only very common, but was 

often more or less recognized. In England it was not until Henry VII's 

time that the violent seizure of a woman was made a criminal offense, and 

even then the statute was limited to women possessed of lands and goods. A 

man might still carry off a girl provided she was not an heiress; but even 

the abduction of heiresses continued to be common, and in Ireland remained 

so until the end of the eighteenth century. But it is not so clear that 

such raids and abductions, even when not of a genuinely hostile character, 

have ever been a recognized and constant method of marriage. 


Page 3 from 5:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   Forward