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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

courtship, and at the same time rendered a pleasurable idea to the female, 

because with primitive man, as well as among his immediate ancestors, the 

victor in love has been the bravest and strongest rather than the most 

beautiful or the most skilful. Until he can fight he is not reckoned a man 

and he cannot hope to win a woman. Among the African Masai a man is not 

supposed to marry until he has blooded his spear, and in a very different 

part of the world, among the Dyaks of Borneo, there can be little doubt 

that the chief incentive to head-hunting is the desire to please the 

women, the possession of a head decapitated by himself being an excellent 

way of winning a maiden's favor.[62] Such instances are too well known to 

need multiplication here, and they survive in civilization, for, even 

among ourselves, although courtship is now chiefly ruled by quite other 

considerations, most women are in some degree emotionally affected by 

strength and courage. But the direct result of this is that a group of 

phenomena with which cruelty and the infliction of pain must inevitably be 

more or less allied is brought within the sphere of courtship and rendered 

agreeable to women. Here, indeed, we have the source of that love of 

cruelty which some have found so marked in women. This is a phase of 

courtship which helps us to understand how it is that, as we shall see, 

the idea of pain, having become associated with sexual emotion, may be 

pleasurable to women. 

 

Thus, in order to understand the connection between love and pain, we have 

once more to return to the consideration, under a somewhat new aspect, of 

the fundamental elements in the sexual impulse. In discussing the 

"Evolution of Modesty" we found that the primary part of the female in 

courtship is the playful, yet serious, assumption of the role of a hunted 

animal who lures on the pursuer, not with the object of escaping, but with 

the object of being finally caught. In considering the "Analysis of the 

Sexual Impulse" we found that the primary part of the male in courtship is 

by the display of his energy and skill to capture the female or to arouse 

in her an emotional condition which leads her to surrender herself to him, 

this process itself at the same time heightening his own excitement. In 

the playing of these two different parts is attained in both male and 

female that charging of nervous energy, that degree of vascular 

tumescence, necessary for adequate discharge and detumescence in an 

explosion by which sperm-cells and germ-cells are brought together for the 

propagation of the race. We are now concerned with the necessary interplay 

of the differing male and female roles in courtship, and with their 

accidental emotional by-products. Both male and female are instinctively 

seeking the same end of sexual union at the moment of highest excitement. 

There cannot, therefore, be real conflict.[63] But there is the semblance 

of a conflict, an apparent clash of aim, an appearance of cruelty. 

Moreover,--and this is a significant moment in the process from our 

present point of view,--when there are rivals for the possession of one 

female there is always a possibility of actual combat, so tending to 

introduce an element of real violence, of undisguised cruelty, which the 

male inflicts on his rival and which the female views with satisfaction 

and delight in the prowess of the successful claimant. Here we are brought 

close to the zooelogical root of the connection between love and pain.[64] 

 

In his admirable work on play in man Groos has fully discussed the plays 

of combat (_Kampfspiele_), which begin to develop even in childhood and 

assume full activity during adolescence; and he points out that, while the 

impulse to such play certainly has a wider biological significance, it 

still possesses a relationship to the sexual life and to the rivalries of 

animals in courtship which must not be forgotten.[65] 


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