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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

ed., 1896, vol. ii, p. 397. 

 

[50] See, e.g., Fere, _L'Instinct Sexuel_, pp. 222-23: Brantome was 

probably the first writer in modern times who referred to this phenomenon. 

MacGillicuddy (_Functional Disorders of the Nervous System in Women_, p. 

110) refers to the case of a lady who always had sudden and uncontrollable 

expulsion of urine whenever her husband even began to perform the marital 

act, on which account he finally ceased intercourse with her. Kubary 

states that in Ponape (Western Carolines) the men are accustomed to 

titillate the vulva of their women with the tongue until the excitement is 

so intense that involuntary emission of urine takes place; this is 

regarded as the proper moment for intercourse. 

 

[51] Thus Pitres and Regis (_Transactions of the International Medical 

Congress, Moscow_, vol. iv, p. 19) record the case of a young girl whose 

life was for some years tormented by a groundless fear of experiencing an 

irresistible desire to urinate. This obsession arose from once seeing at a 

theater a man whom she liked, and being overcome by sexual feeling 

accompanied by so strong a desire to urinate that she had to leave the 

theater. An exactly similar case in a young woman of erotic temperament, 

but prudish, has been recorded by Freud (_Zur Neurosenlehre_, Bd. i, p. 

54). Morbid obsessions of modesty involving the urinary sphere and 

appearing at puberty are evidently based on transformed sexual emotion. 

Such a case has been recorded by Marandon de Montyel (_Archives de 

Neurologie_, vol. xii, 1901, p. 36); this lady, who was of somewhat 

neuropathic temperament, from puberty onward, in order to be able to 

urinate found it necessary not only to be absolutely alone, but to feel 

assured that no one even knew what was taking place. 

 

[52] H. Ellis, "The Bladder as a Dynamometer," _American Journal of 

Dermatology_, May, 1902. 

 

[53] Sir W. Gowers, "Minor Epilepsy," _British Medical Journal_, January 

6, 1900; ib., _Epilepsy_, 2d ed., 1901, p. 106; see also H. Ellis, art. 

"Urinary Bladder, Influence of the Mind on the," in Tuke's _Dictionary of 

Psychological Medicine_. 

 

[54] Serieux, _Recherches Cliniques sur les Anomalies de l'Instinct 

Sexuel_, p. 22. 

 

[55] Emil Schultze-Malkowsky, "Der Sexuelle Trieb in Kindesalter," 

_Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_, vol. ii, part 8, p. 372. 

 

[56] Fere, "Note sur un Cas de Periodicite Sexuelle chez l'Homme," 

_Comptes-rendus Societe de Biologie_, July 23, 1904. 

 

[57] It is a familiar fact that, in women, occasionally, a violent 

explosion of laughter may be propagated to the bladder-center and produce 

urination. "She laughed till she nearly wetted the floor," I have heard a 

young woman in the country say, evidently using without thought a familiar 

locution. Professor Bechterew has recorded the case of a young married 

lady who, from childhood, wherever she might be--in friends' houses, in 

the street, in her own drawing-room--had always experienced an involuntary 

and forcible emission of urine, which could not be stopped or controlled, 

whenever she laughed; the bladder was quite sound and no muscular effort 

produced the same result. (W. Bechterew, _Neurologisches Centralblatt_, 

1899.) In women these relationships are most easily observed, partly 

because in them the explosive centers are more easily discharged, and 

partly, it is probable, so far as the bladder is concerned, because, 

although after death the resistance to the emission of urine is notably 

less in women, during life about the same amount of force is necessary in 

both sexes; so that a greater amount of energy flows to the bladder in 

women, and any nervous storm or disturbance is thus specially apt to 

affect the bladder. 

 

[58] "Every pain," remarks Marie de Manaceine, "produces a number of 

movements which are apparently useless: we cry out, we groan, we move our 

limbs, we throw ourselves from one side to the other, and at bottom all 


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