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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

be effected at all; in women, though tumescence is not essential to 

coitus, it is essential to orgasm and the accompanying physical and 

psychic relief. The preference which women often experience for prolonged 

coitus is not, as might possibly be imagined, due to sensuality, but has a 

profound physiological basis. 

 

[36] Stanley Hall, _Adolescence_, vol. i, p. 223. 

 

[37] See Lagrange's _Physiology of Bodily Exercise_, especially chapter 

ii. It is a significant fact that, as Sergi remarks (_Les Emotions_, p. 

330), the physiological results of dancing are identical with the 

physiological results of pleasure. 

 

[38] Groos, _Spiele der Menschen_, p. 112. Zmigrodzki (_Die Mutter bei den 

Volkern des Arischen Stammes_, p. 414 et seq.) has an interesting passage 

describing the dance--especially the Russian dance--in its orgiastic 

aspects. 

 

[39] Fere, "L'Influence sur le Travail Volontaire d'un muscle de 

l'activite d'autres muscles," _Nouvelles Iconographie de la Salpetriere_, 

1901. 

 

[40] "The sensation of motion," Kline remarks ("The Migratory Impulse," 

_American Journal of Psychology_, October, 1898, p. 62), "as yet but 

little studied from a pleasure-pain standpoint, is undoubtedly a 

pleasure-giving sensation. For Aristippus the end of life is pleasure, 

which he defines as gentle motion. Motherhood long ago discovered its 

virtue as furnished by the cradle. Galloping to town on the parental knee 

is a pleasing pastime in every nursery. The several varieties of swings, 

the hammock, see-saw, flying-jenny, merry-go-round, shooting the chutes, 

sailing, coasting, rowing, and skating, together with the fondness of 

children for rotating rapidly in one spot until dizzy and for jumping from 

high places, are all devices and sports for stimulating the sense of 

motion. In most of these modes of motion the body is passive or 

semipassive, save in such motions as skating and rotating on the feet. The 

passiveness of the body precludes any important contribution of stimuli 

from kinesthetic sources. The stimuli are probably furnished, as Dr. Hall 

and others have suggested, by a redistribution of fluid pressure (due to 

the unusual motions and positions of the body) to the inner walls of the 

several vascular systems of the body." 

 

[41] _Anatomy of Melancholy_, part iii., sect. ii, mem. ii, subs. iv. 

 

[42] Sadger, "Haut-, Schleimhaut-, und Muskel-erotik," _Jahrbuch fuer 

psychoanalytische Forschungen_, Bd. iii, 1912, p. 556. 

 

[43] Marro (_Puberta_, p. 367 et seq.) has some observations on this 

point. It was an insight into this action of dancing which led the Spanish 

clergy of the eighteenth century to encourage the national enthusiasm for 

dancing (as Baretti informs us) in the interests of morality. 

 

[44] It is scarcely necessary to remark that a primitive dance, even when 

associated with courtship, is not necessarily a sexual pantomime; as 

Wallaschek, in his comprehensive survey of primitive dances, observes, it 

is more usually an animal pantomime, but nonetheless connected with the 

sexual instinct, separation of the sexes, also, being no proof to the 

contrary. (Wallaschek, _Primitive Music_, pp. 211-13.) Grosse (_Anfaenge 

der Kunst_, English translation, p. 228) has pointed out that the best 

dancer would be the best fighter and hunter, and that sexual selection and 

natural selection would thus work in harmony. 

 

[45] Fere, "Le plaisir de la vue du Mouvement," _Comptes-rendus de la 

Societe de Biologie_, November 2, 1901; also _Travail et Plaisir_, ch. 

xxix. 

 

[46] Groos repeatedly emphasizes the significance of this fact (_Spiele 

der Menschen_, pp. 81-9, 460 et seq.); Grosse (_Anfaenge der Kunst_, p. 

215) had previously made some remarks on this point. 

 

[47] M. Kulischer, "Die Geschlechtliche Zuchtwahl bei den Menschen in der 

Urzeit," _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1876, p. 140 _et seq._ 

 

[48] Sir W.R. Gowers, _Epilepsy_, 2d ed., 1901, pp. 61, 138. 

 

[49] Guyon, _Lecons Cliniques sur les Maladies des Voies Urinaires_, 3d 


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