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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

der Thiere_, p. 202. 

 

[29] _Die Spiele der Thiere_, p. 244. This had been briefly pointed out by 

earlier writers. Thus, Haeckel (_Gen. Morph._, ii, p. 244) remarked that 

fighting for females is a special or modified kind of struggle for 

existence, and that it acts on both sexes. 

 

[30] It may be added that in the human species, as Bray remarks ("Le Beau 

dans la Nature," _Revue Philosophique_, October, 1901, p. 403), "the hymen 

would seem to tend to the same end, as if nature had wished to reinforce 

by a natural obstacle the moral restraint of modesty, so that only the 

vigorous male could insure his reproduction." There can be no doubt that 

among many animals pairing is delayed so far as possible until maturity is 

reached. "It is a strict rule amongst birds," remarks J.G. Millais (op. 

cit., p. 46), "that they do not breed until both sexes have attained the 

perfect adult plumage." Until that happens, it seems probable, the 

conditions for sexual excitation are not fully established. We know 

little, says Howard (_Zooelogist_, 1903, p. 407), of the age at which birds 

begin to breed, but it is known that "there are yearly great numbers of 

individuals who do not breed, and the evidence seems to show that such 

individuals are immature." 

 

[31] A. Marro, _La Puberte_, 1901, p. 464. 

 

[32] Lloyd Morgan, _Animal Behavior_, 1900, pp. 264-5. It may be added 

that, on the esthetic side, Hirn, in his study (_The Origins of Art_, 

1900), reaches conclusions which likewise, in the main, concord with those 

of Groos. 

 

[33] It may be noted that the marriage ceremony itself is often of the 

nature of a courtship, a symbolic courtship, embodying a method of 

attaining tumescence. As Crawley, who has brought out this point, puts it, 

"Marriage-rites of union are essentially identical with love charms," and 

he refers in illustration to the custom of the Australian Arunta, among 

whom the man or woman by making music on the bull-roarer compels a person 

of the opposite sex to court him or her, the marriage being thus 

completed. (E. Crawley, _The Mystic Rose_, p. 318.) 

 

[34] The more carefully animals are observed, the more often this is found 

to be the case, even with respect to species which possess no obvious and 

elaborate process for obtaining tumescence. See, for instance, the 

detailed and very instructive account--too long to quote here--given by E. 

Selous of the preliminaries to intercourse practised by a pair of great 

crested grebes, while nest-building. Intercourse only took place with much 

difficulty, after many fruitless invitations, more usually given by the 

female. ("Observational Diary of the Habits of the Great Crested Grebe," 

_Zoeologist_, September, 1901.) It is exactly the same with savages. The 

observation of Foley (_Bulletin de la Societe d'Anthropologie de Paris_, 

November 6, 1879) that in savages "sexual erethism is very difficult" is 

of great significance and certainly in accordance with the facts. This 

difficulty of erethism is the real cause of many savage practices which to 

the civilized person often seem perverse; the women of the Caroline 

Islands, for instance, as described by Finsch, require the tongue or even 

the teeth to be applied to the clitoris, or a great ant to be applied to 

bite the parts, in order to stimulate orgasm. Westermarck, after quoting a 

remark of Mariner's concerning the women of Tonga,--"it must not be 

supposed that these women are always easily won; the greatest attentions 

and the most fervent solicitations are sometimes requisite, even though 

there be no other lover in the way,"--adds that these words "hold true for 

a great many, not to say all, savage and barbarous races now existing." 

(_Human Marriage_, p. 163.) The old notions, however, as to the sexual 

licentiousness of peoples living in natural conditions have scarcely yet 

disappeared. See Appendix A; "The Sexual Instinct in Savages." 

 

[35] In men a certain degree of tumescence is essential before coitus can 


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