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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

The Catholic theologians (Debreyne, _Moechialogie_, pp. 190-199) 

for the most part condemn dancing with much severity. In 

Protestant Germany, also, it is held that dance meetings and 

musical gatherings are frequent occasions of unchastity. Thus in 

the Leipzig district when a girl is asked "How did you fall?" she 

nearly always replies "At the dance." (_Die 

Geschlechtlich-Sittliche Verhaeltnisse im Deutschen Reiche_, vol. 

i, p. 196.) It leads quite as often, and no doubt oftener, to 

marriage. Rousseau defended it on this account (_Nouvelle 

Heloise_, bk. iv, letter x); dancing is, he held, an admirable 

preliminary to courtship, and the best way for young people to 

reveal themselves to each other, in their grace and decorum, 

their qualities and defects, while its publicity is its 

safeguard. An International Congress of Dancing Masters was held 

at Barcelona in 1907. In connection with this Congress, Giraudet, 

president of the International Academy of Dancing Masters, issued 

an inquiry to over 3000 teachers of dancing throughout the world 

in order to ascertain the frequency with which dancing led to 

marriage. Of over one million pupils of dancing, either married 

or engaged to be married, it was found that in most countries 

more than 50 per cent. met their conjugal partners at dances. The 

smallest proportion was in Norway, with only 39 per cent., and 

the highest, Germany, with 97 per cent. Intermediate are France, 

83 per cent.; America, 80 per cent.; Italy, 70 per cent.; Spain, 

68 per cent.; Holland, Bulgaria, and England, 65 per cent.; 

Australia and Roumania, 60 per cent., etc. Of the teachers 

themselves 92 per cent. met their partners at dances. (Quoted 

from the _Figaro_ in Beiblatt "Sexualreform" to _Geschlecht und 

Gesellschaft_, 1907, p. 175.) 

 

In civilization, however, dancing is not only an incitement to love and a 

preliminary to courtship, but it is often a substitute for the normal 

gratification of the sexual instinct, procuring something of the pleasure 

and relief of gratified love. In occasional abnormal cases this may be 

consciously realized. Thus Sadger, who regards the joy of dancing as a 

manifestation of "muscular eroticism," gives the case of a married 

hysterical woman of 21, with genital anesthesia, but otherwise strongly 

developed skin eroticism, who was a passionate dancer: "I often felt as 

though I was giving myself to my partner in dancing," she said, "and was 

actually having coitus with him. I have the feeling that in me dancing 

takes the place of coitus."[42] Normally something of the same feeling is 

experienced by many young women, who will expend a prodigious amount of 

energy in dancing, thus procuring, not fatigue, but happiness and 

relief.[43] It is significant that, after sexual relations have begun, 

girls generally lose much of their ardor in dancing. Even our modern 

dances, it is worthy of note, are often of sexual origin; thus, the most 

typical of all, the waltz, was originally (as Schaller, quoted by Groos, 

states) the close of a complicated dance which "represented the romance of 

love, the seeking and the fleeing, the playful sulking and shunning, and 

finally the jubilation of the wedding."[44] 

 

Not only is movement itself a source of tumescence, but even the spectacle 

of movement tends to produce the same effect. The pleasure of witnessing 

movement, as represented by its stimulating effect on the muscular 

system,--for states of well-being are accompanied by an increase of 

power,--has been found susceptible of exact measurement by Fere. He has 

shown that to watch a colored disk when in motion produced stronger 

muscular contractions, as measured by the dynamometer, than to watch the 

same disk when motionless. Even in the absence of color a similar 

influence of movement was noted, and watching a modified metronome 

produced a greater increase of work with the ergograph than when working 


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