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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

general, because it touches every vital organ, the higher centers 

no longer dominating. Primitive dancing differs very widely from 

that civilized kind of dancing--finding its extreme type in the 

ballet--in which energy is concentrated into the muscles below 

the knee. In the finest kinds of primitive dancing all the limbs, 

the whole body, take part. For instance, "the Marquisan girls," 

Herman Melville remarked in _Typee_, "dance all over, as it were; 

not only do their feet dance, but their arms, hands, 

fingers,--ay, their very eyes seem to dance in their heads. In 

good sooth, they so sway their floating forms, arch their necks, 

toss aloft their naked arms, and glide, and swim, and whirl," 

etc. 

 

If we turn to a very different people, we find this 

characteristic of primitive dancing admirably illustrated by the 

missionary, Holden, in the case of Kaffir dances. "So far as I 

have observed," he states, "the perfection of the art or science 

consists in their _being able to put every part of the body into 

motion at the same time_. And as they are naked, the bystander 

has a good opportunity of observing the whole process, which 

presents a remarkably odd and grotesque appearance,--the head, 

the trunk, the arms, the legs, the hands, the feet, bones, 

muscles, sinews, skin, scalp, and hair, each and all in motion at 

the same time, with feathers waving, tails of monkeys and wild 

beasts dangling, and shields beating, accompanied with whistling, 

shouting, and leaping. It would appear as though the whole frame 

was hung on springing wires or cords. Dances are held in high 

repute, being the natural expression of joyous emotion, or 

creating it when absent. There is, perhaps, no exercise in 

greater accordance with the sentiments or feelings of a barbarous 

people, or more fully calculated to gratify their wild and 

ungoverned passions." (W.C. Holden, _The Kaffir Race_, 1866, p. 

274.) 

 

Dancing, as the highest and most complex form of muscular movement, is the 

most potent method of obtaining the organic excitement muscular movement 

yields, and thus we understand how from the earliest zooelogical ages it 

has been brought to the service of the sexual instinct as a mode of 

attaining tumescence. Among savages this use of dancing works harmoniously 

with the various other uses which dancing possesses in primitive times 

and which cause it to occupy so large and vital a part in savage life that 

it may possibly even affect the organism to such an extent as to mold the 

bones; so that some authorities have associated platycnemia with dancing. 

As civilization advances, the other uses of dancing fall away, but it 

still remains a sexual stimulant. Burton, in his _Anatomy of Melancholy_, 

brings forward a number of quotations from old authors showing that 

dancing is an incitement to love.[41] 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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