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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

love-relations." (Sanford Bell, "The Emotion of Love Between the 

Sexes," _American Journal Psychology_, July, 1902; cf. 

"Showing-off and Bashfulness," _Pedagogical Seminary_, June, 

1903.) 

 

If, in the light of the previous discussion, we examine such facts as 

those here collected, we may easily trace throughout the perpetual 

operations of the same instinct. It is everywhere the instinctive object 

of the male, who is very rarely passive in the process of courtship, to 

assure by his activity in display, his energy or skill or beauty, both his 

own passion and the passion of the female. Throughout nature sexual 

conjugation only takes place after much expenditure of energy.[34] We are 

deceived by what we see among highly fed domesticated animals, and among 

the lazy classes of human society, whose sexual instincts are at once both 

unnaturally stimulated and unnaturally repressed, when we imagine that the 

instinct of detumescence is normally ever craving to be satisfied, and 

that throughout nature it can always be set off at a touch whenever the 

stimulus is applied. So far from the instinct of tumescence naturally 

needing to be crushed, it needs, on the contrary, in either sex to be 

submitted to the most elaborate and prolonged processes in order to bring 

about those conditions which detumescence relieves. A state of tumescence 

is not normally constant, and tumescence must be obtained before 

detumescence is possible.[35] The whole object of courtship, of the mutual 

approximation and caresses of two persons of the opposite sex, is to 

create the state of sexual tumescence. 

 

It will be seen that the most usual method of attaining tumescence--a 

method found among the most various kinds of animals, from insects and 

birds to man--is some form of the dance. Among the Negritos of the 

Philippines dancing is described by A.B. Meyer as "jumping in a circle 

around a girl and stamping with the feet"; as we have seen, such a dance 

is, essentially, a form of courtship that is widespread among animals. 

"The true cake-walk," again, Stanley Hall remarks, "as seen in the South 

is perhaps the purest expression of this impulse to courtship antics seen 

in man."[36] Muscular movement of which the dance is the highest and most 

complex expression, is undoubtedly a method of auto-intoxication of the 

very greatest potency. All energetic movement, indeed, tends to produce 

active congestion. In its influence on the brain violent exercise may thus 

result in a state of intoxication even resembling insanity. As Lagrange 

remarks, the visible effects of exercise--heightened color, bright eyes, 

resolute air and walk--are those of slight intoxication, and a girl who 

has waltzed for a quarter of an hour is in the same condition as if she 

had drunk champagne.[37] Groos regards the dance as, above all, an 

intoxicating play of movement, possessing, like other methods of 

intoxication,--and even apart from its relationship to combat and 

love,--the charm of being able to draw us out of our everyday life and 

lead us into a self-created dream-world.[38] That the dance is not only a 

narcotic, but also a powerful stimulant, we may clearly realize from the 

experiments which show that this effect is produced even by much less 

complex kinds of muscular movement. This has been clearly determined, for 

instance, by Fere, in the course of a long and elaborate series of 

experiments dealing with the various influences that modify work as 

measured by Mosso's ergograph. This investigator found that muscular 

movement is the most efficacious of all stimulants in increasing muscular 

power.[39] It is easy to trace these pleasurable effects of combined 

narcotic and stimulant motion in everyday life and it is unnecessary to 

enumerate its manifestations.[40] 

 

Dancing is so powerful an agent on the organism, as Sergi truly 

remarks (_Les Emotions_, p. 288), because its excitation is 


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