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CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

fellow's muscles quiver from head to foot and his jaws tremble 

without any apparent ability on his part to control them, until, 

foaming at the mouth and with his eyes rolling, he falls in a 

paroxysm upon the ground, to be carried off by his companions." 

The writer adds significantly that this dancing "would seem to 

emanate from a species of voluptuousness." (Mrs. French-Sheldon, 

"Customs among the Natives of East Africa," _Journal of the 

Anthropological Institute_, vol. xxi, May, 1892, pp. 366-67.) It 

may be added that among the Suaheli dances are intimately 

associated with weddings; the Suaheli dances have been minutely 

described by Velten (_Sitten und Gebraueche der Suaheli_, pp. 

144-175). Among the Akamba of British East Africa, also, 

according to H.R. Tate (_Journal of the Anthropological 

Institute_, Jan.-June, 1904, p. 137), the dances are followed by 

connection between the young men and girls, approved of by the 

parents. 

 

The dances of the Faroe Islanders have been described by Raymond 

Pilet ("Rapport sur une Mission en Islande et aux lies Feroe," 

_Nouvelles Archives des Missions Scientifiques_, tome vii, 1897, 

p. 285). These dances, which are entirely decorous, include 

poetry, music, and much mimicry, especially of battle. They 

sometimes last for two consecutive days and nights. "The dance is 

simply a permitted and discreet method by which the young men may 

court the young girls. The islander enters the circle and places 

himself beside the girl to whom he desires to show his affection; 

if he meets with her approval she stays and continues to dance at 

his side; if not, she leaves the circle and appears later at 

another spot." 

 

Pitre (_Usi, etc., del Popolo Siciliano_, vol. ii, p. 24, as 

quoted in Marro's _Puberta_) states that in Sicily the youth who 

wishes to marry seeks to give some public proof of his valor and 

to show himself off. In Chiaramonte, in evidence of his virile 

force, he bears in procession the standard of some confraternity, 

a high and richly adorned standard which makes its staff bend to 

a semicircle, of such enormous weight that the bearer must walk 

in a painfully bent position, his head thrown back and his feet 

forward. On reaching the house of his betrothed he makes proof of 

his boldness and skill in wielding this extremely heavy standard 

which at this moment seems a plaything in his hands, but may yet 

prove fatal to him through injury to the loins or other parts. 

 

This same tendency, which we find in so highly developed a degree 

among animals and primitive human peoples, is also universal 

among the children of even the most civilized human races, 

although in a less organized and more confused way. It manifests 

itself as "showing-off." Sanford Bell, in his study of the 

emotion of love in children, finds that "showing-off" is an 

essential element in the love of children in what he terms the 

second stage (from the eighth to the twelfth year in girls and 

the fourteenth in boys). "It constitutes one of the chief numbers 

in the boy's repertory of love charms, and is not totally absent 

from the girl's. It is a most common sight to see the boys taxing 

their resources in devising means of exposing their own 

excellencies, and often doing the most ridiculous and extravagant 

things. Running, jumping, dancing, prancing, sparring, wrestling, 

turning handsprings, somersaults, climbing, walking fences, 

swinging, giving yodels and yells, whistling, imitating the 

movements of animals, 'taking people off,' courting danger, 

affecting courage are some of its common forms.... This 

'showing-off' in the boy lover is the forerunner of the skilful, 

purposive, and elaborate means of self-exhibition in the adult 


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