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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Goncourt reports the account given him by a French officer from 

Senegal of the dances of the women, "a dance which is a gentle 

oscillation of the body, with gradually increasing excitement, 

from time to time a woman darting forward from the group to stand 

in front of her lover, contorting herself as though in a 

passionate embrace, and, on passing her hand between her thighs, 

showing it covered with the moisture of amorous enjoyment." 

(_Journal_, vol. ix, p. 79.) The dance here referred to is 

probably the Bamboula dance of the Wolofs, a spring festival 

which has been described by Pierre Loti in his _Roman d'un 

Spahi_, and concerning which various details are furnished by a 

French army-surgeon, acquainted with Senegal, in his _Untrodden 

Fields of Anthropology_. The dance, as described by the latter, 

takes place at night during full moon, the dancers, male and 

female, beginning timidly, but, as the beat of the tam-tams and 

the encouraging cries of the spectators become louder, the dance 

becomes more furious. The native name of the dance is _anamalis 

fobil_, "the dance of the treading drake." "The dancer in his 

movements imitates the copulation of the great Indian duck. This 

drake has a member of a corkscrew shape, and a peculiar movement 

is required to introduce it into the duck. The woman tucks up her 

clothes and convulsively agitates the lower part of her body; she 

alternately shows her partner her vulva and hides it from him by 

a regular movement, backward and forward, of the body." 

(_Untrodden Fields of Anthropology_, Paris, 1898, vol. ii, p. 

112.) 

 

Among the Gurus of the Ivory Coast (Gulf of Guinea), Eysseric 

observes, dancing is usually carried on at night and more 

especially by the men, and on certain occasions women must not 

appear, for if they assisted at fetichistic dances "they would 

die." Under other circumstances men and women dance together with 

ardor, not forming couples but often _vis-a-vis_: their movements 

are lascivious. Even the dances following a funeral tend to 

become sexual in character. At the end of the rites attending the 

funeral of a chief's son the entire population began to dance 

with ever-growing ardor; there was nothing ritualistic or sad in 

these contortions, which took on the character of a lascivious 

dance. Men and women, boys and girls, young and old, sought to 

rival each other in suppleness, and the festival became joyous 

and general, as if in celebration of a marriage or a victory. 

(Eysseric, "La Cote d'Ivoire," _Nouvelles Archives des Missions 

Scientifiques_, tome ix, 1890, pp. 241-49.) 

 

Mrs. French-Sheldon has described the marriage-rites she observed 

at Taveta in East Africa. "During this time the young people 

dance and carouse and make themselves generally merry and 

promiscuously drunk, carrying the excess of their dissipation to 

such an extent that they dance until they fall down in a species 

of epileptic fit." It is the privilege of the bridegroom's four 

groomsmen to enjoy the bride first, and she is then handed over 

to her legitimate husband. This people, both men and women, are 

"great dancers and merry-makers; the young fellows will collect 

in groups and dance as though in competition one with the other; 

one lad will dash out from the circle of his companions, rush 

into the middle of a circumscribed space, and scream out 'Wow, 

wow!' Another follows him and screams; then a third does the 

same. These men will dance with their knees almost rigid, jumping 

into the air until their excitement becomes very great and their 

energy almost spasmodic, leaving the ground frequently three feet 

as they spring into the air. At some of their festivals their 

dancing is carried to such an extent that I have seen a young 


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